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LexandNeek

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LexandNeek last won the day on June 19

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About LexandNeek

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  1. I've posted before in this forum about our road trip through Highway 50 and all the places we had to get our passport stamped to prove we survived "The Loneliest Road in America." Well, we mailed it in and a couple months later, we got our certificates in the mail!
  2. Our next stop on our little desert road trip took us to Indio. One place that Neek, Sar and I were really curious to visit was Shields Date Garden. I had never been to this place before even though I love dates; as a child my parents took me to another place that sells dates in Cabazon, Hadley Fruit Orchards (more on that in a later episode). But I had seen the place before on a Huell Howser TV show on public television, so I was very excited to experience the place!
  3. Abandoned Summer Camp and Ranch (SAME DAY ADVENTURE)

    I gotta say the camp footage that you did capture was pretty cool. And of course your drone shots are exceptional!
  4. That's cool, I didn't know that! I'll have to check that out.
  5. Leonard Knight must have been very impressed when he saw a hot air balloon fly near his home in Vermont in 1971. When he later moved to Nebraska, he built his own balloon with the words, “God is Love” but never got it to fly. Finally in 1984, Leonard moved to a remote desert town in California called Niland and decided this would be the place to build his testimonial to God.
  6. It seems like we just can’t stay away from the road! Neek, Sar and I once again piled into the car and took off. Once again, one of my sisters (the youngest) was getting married and we were invited. But it wasn’t in Oregon; this was a destination wedding in Palm Springs, California. We decided to make the most of this occasion and planned a desert road trip!
  7. It's the reverse with me; haven't been to the San Francisco one yet. Hopefully someday!
  8. It seemed fitting to finish up our road trip by visiting the Ghirardelli Chocolate Outlet store and having a decadent sundae. They are the masters in making the most incredible ice cream delights!
  9. Pretty close! I was in Whittier at the time. We also went to Sutter's Mill where we panned for gold. I remember getting a couple gold flakes that I brought home. Definitely a long haul, but lots of fun!
  10. Thinking back on my elementary school days, some of my favorite moments, outside of lunch and recess, were the times we went on field trips. Sure, a lot of the joy I received at the time was escaping the tediousness of the classroom, but there was also the excitement of discovering new things and going fun places! Of all my field trip memories, my favorite is the trip I took in 4th grade to Sacramento. We got to see the capitol building, had what I considered a real treat at the time eating dinner at McDonalds and stayed overnight in a hotel! But the highlight in my mind was visiting Sutter’s Fort.
  11. I wish we knew too! We didn't see any plaque around there giving any more specific information about them.
  12. Old Sacramento is located within the Old Sacramento Historic District which is a U.S. National Historic Landmark District. The city of Sacramento was developed in the mid-nineteenth century as an extension of Sutter’s Fort as the Sacramento River was the main waterway to the west coast. We really enjoyed checking out the historic buildings and the underground tunnels!
  13. My sister-in-law gave my wife a book years ago called “Weird California”. I thought it was a great title for a book considering how often California marches to the beat of its own drum. Anyway, it’s also inspired me to go out and find some of the strange, unique, creative and “weird” stuff that I have a tendency to be attracted to. The Giant Cement Statues of Auburn, California are definitely one of them.
  14. This 19th century bridge attracted our curiosity because it is reported to be the longest single span wooden covered bridge in the world! The Bridgeport Covered Bridge was built in 1862 by David John Wood and was a vital link to the silver mines in Nevada at the time, with up to 100 wagons a day coming through the area. It was closed to vehicular traffic in 1972 and pedestrian traffic in 2011. But we still wanted to get as close as we could to check it out for ourselves!
  • Our picks

    • South Pass City, approximately 90 miles north of Rock Springs, is a historic site administered by the state of Wyoming.  It consists of over 30 log, frame, and stone buildings, along with the Carissa Mine and Stamp Mill.



      South Pass City Historic Site
    • Recently, I’ve been going through my old VHS video tapes and digitizing them to DVDs.  These tapes contain my travels and explorations between 1995 and 2009.  I thought I’d start releasing some video shorts of my early travels on this forum.

      The back story for this particular video is as follows.  On March 30, 1996, I made a short hike of about a mile and a third up the lower third of Surprise Canyon, on the western slopes of the Panamint Range, Inyo County, California.  This canyon is just outside of Death Valley National Park.  This canyon has running water running year round through the stretch shown, fed by substantial Limekiln Springs, and the canyon is a water wonderland.  For those not familiar with the area, refer to the two maps.  The first one shows the canyon in relation to the region, the other a close up of the canyon and the ghost town of Panamint City.  The blue line in the close up image shows the route that was taken.

      • 24 replies
    • My next series of videos will be based on a trip in 2000 that I took with Lew Shorb.  Lew is a board member here, as well as owner of the popular website http://www.ghosttownexplorers.org/ghost.htm

      In breaking with my past habit of culling out historical sites and ghost towns and creating short videos dealing with these, I decided to keep the exploring part of Explore Forums in and create videos of each day of my travel and exploration, including our camps.  Scenery, travel, camping ghost towns and wide open spaces.

      Part one of this series, as well as subsequent videos, will all appear here within this same thread. Part I will start in my garage, where I was finishing up with the packing my truck.  The following day, after work, I begin my travels to meet Lew Shorb at Rhyolite, Nevada ghost town.

      Our three day, two night travels prowled about the "Nevada Triangle" section of northeastern Death Valley National Park; and will include such sites as:

      1. The Las Vegas & Tonopah Railroad
      2. Gold Bar
      3. Phinney Mine
      4. Strozzi Ranch
      5. Currie Well (LV&T RR)
      6. Mud Springs Summit (LV&T RR)
      7. Happy Hooligan Mine


      This video, that of March 30th and 31st, will start off this series; and is brief, only being 3:28 long.  Nevada-Triangle_Shorb-2000_Part-1.wmv

      So, below is my narrative of part one of this series to give full context of what is seen in the video.  It will probably take longer to read than the video is long.

      --------------------------


       
      • 9 replies
    • Exploration Field Trips:
      May 1-3, 2000
      Trip with Alan Patera and Alan Hensher into Death Valley

      What do you do with three authors, two 4x4’s, two two-way radios, three cameras, and camping supplies? Send them to Death Valley, of course. For three days in the first week of May, 2000, fellow authors and historical researchers Alan Patera, Alan Hensher and myself explored Death Valley north and south.

      Alan Patera writes and publishes the WESTERN PLACES series of monograph books.  Alan Hensher has been published in several periodicals as well as authoring several books, centering primarily on the history of Mojave Desert sites.

      Alan Patera, who hails from Oregon, came south to California and picked up Alan Hensher; then the two came my way. At the time I was living in Ridgecrest, California. After overnighting with my wife and I, the three of us took off for Death Valley.  Alan was busy researching and photographing for a future edition of WESTERN PLACES, this time centering on the camps of the Funeral Range, which forms the eastern border of east central Death Valley.  Circumstances and changes of our journey lead Alan to plant the seeds of two more future books, this time centering just outside the northernmost section of Death Valley.




       

       
      • 4 replies
    • Reconnoitering Trips
      Northern Nevada, Southwestern Idaho
      (and a Blip of Southeastern Oregon Thrown in for Good Measure)
      June 19 - 28, 2001

      This is the trip that I consider to be my favorite trip I have ever undertaken.  It had been in the planning stages since the previous December.  Originally, quite a number of people were invited and had semi-committed themselves to come along.  Over time, however, eventually the number of people whose semi-commitments became firm commitments to this trip narrowed to four.  And I was one of them.

      Below, a list of historic locations we visited – in the order that we visited them:

      1. Bodie & Benton Railway, California.
      2. Stillwater, Nevada.
      3. White Cloud City (Coppereid), Nevada.
      4. Unionville, Nevada.
      5. Midas, Nevada.
      6. Spring City, Nevada.
      7. Paradise Valley, Nevada.
      8. Buckskin, Nevada.
      9. National, Nevada.
      10. Delamar, Idaho.
      11. Silver City, Idaho.
      12. Rio Tinto, Nevada.
      13. Pattsville, Nevada.
      14. Aura, Nevada.
      15. Cornucopia, Nevada.
      16. Edgemont, Nevada (from a distance – on private property)
      17. White Rock, Nevada (from a distance – on private property)
      18. Tuscaurora, Nevada.
      19. Dinner Station, Nevada.
      20. Metropolis, Nevada.
      21. Charleston, Nevada.
      22. Jarbidge, Nevada.
      • 16 replies
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