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Found 227 results

  1. I have never been to Burning Man and truthfully, the clothing optional aspects of it intimidate the hell out of me. The artwork and designs of the temporary structures fascinate my aesthetic imagination, therefore, it was to my delight that some of the smaller artwork from the 2016 Burning Man is displayed at Reno Playa Art Park.
  2. I'm mad at myself.

    A couple months ago here in northern Nevada an ammo company was looking for a place to shoot out to 2.5 miles, my friend (used to be sponsored by them) I showed them an area out off the 95N just south of the I-80. They seemed like good folks at first so I spent a couple days with them in our beautiful desert shooting. We all left the first time, no trash cleaned up, then afterwards they came out again, didn' invite me, ok fine no big deal, they put out a video of them doing a 2,500 yard shot in my spot a couple months later. Yesterday I went out with a friend to shoot long range out there, we set up our targets, go to the shooting position at the mine entrances. There is an old collapsed house up there I start walking around and find a grill they left, then I find about 20 foam ear plugs, bags of trash, soda cans, and wood and soda cams tossed into a hole about 7 foot deep, I called them out about it and they are saying I staged it! Ha, yeah ok. Can't trust folks one bit. I am mad at myself for showing them this area. I cleaned it all up and threw it away for em.
  3. Walking up C Street in Virginia City, Neek, Sar and I decided to explore one last saloon in town. Like the other saloons, this place has a history going back to the 19th century. It also, like some other saloons, has reports of paranormal activity. But there’s something about the Washoe Club that demands a closer look, which is exactly what we gave it!
  4. The main drag in Virginia City, Nevada (known as C Street) normally evokes the feeling of an Old West town. The street is filled with old saloons, many of them dating back to the 19th century when the town was in the throes of a silver rush from the discovery of the Comstock Lode in 1859. But on the day that Neek, Sar and I visited, the main feeling that C Street evoked was hunger!
  5. I remember reading in Nevada Magazine about the history of Steven's Camp, Nevada. I searched online and could only find a completely different story by the Black Rock Explorers Society, but the story was nothing like the story I had read in Nevada Magazine. With some searching, I was able to find the real history that I read about in Nevada Magazine about the property being owned by a somewhat famous Country Music star who went by the name Tennessee Ernie Ford. Here is a link to that article for anyone interested in reading it Seems the first link about Steven's Camp makes the claim that, "It was built primarily as a rescue cabin on BLM land without BLM permission by winter hunters, primarily for winter hunters who might get stranded in the Nevada snows. It has been maintained so well by people who take advantage of its existence that the BLM has given its blessing. Even still no one officially maintains it." You can read that article here. Unfortunately the first link that comes up when searching for Steven's Camp Nevada is the link with the false information. Let's see if we can get this post to show up first when someone searches for it.
  6. During our Highway 50 Loneliest Road in America Challenge, we found out that the Eureka Opera House in Eureka, Nevada was a recently renovated cousin to the Piper’s Opera House in Virginia City, Nevada. We decided to visit. The first Piper’s Opera House (formerly Maguire’s Opera House) was built in 1863 was burned down in the Great Fire of 1875. Piper was able to raise funds to rebuild it from promoting shows at his other venues. The second Opera House burned down in 1883 when John Piper allegedly left a cigar unattended in his upstairs apartment. The current house was built in 1885 and has stood since. I guess the third time was the charm!
  7. The shopkeeper told us that the St. Augustine’s Catholic Church in Austin, Nevada, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, was abandoned for now and that we should go take a look. Neek got quite a scare from what she thought might be a ghost, but it turned out to be a pleasant surprise!
  8. Our first stop in Austin, Nevada was in front of the Lander County Courthouse built in 1869. This is one of 11 sites in Austin on the National Register of Historic Places including the curious abandoned Stokes Castle built in 1897.
  9. Hi, this is Lex and Neek. We're a married couple from southern California and we're happy to find and join this forum! We have a youtube channel where we have been sharing our adventures for a little over a year now, but we've enjoyed exploring abandoned places together for well over a decade now. Whether it's something local or something we see on a road trip, we love the adventure of exploring an abandoned place. We particularly are fascinated with discovering the history of these places, whether it's from information provided at the site or researching online. But sometimes we can't find the history, so we are left with a mystery. That is precisely what happened during our recent drive through "The Loneliest Road in America," Highway 50 in Nevada. Between Ely and Eureka, there is an abandoned cabin that remains a complete mystery and fills our imaginations with wonder. Could this cabin be a genuine relic of the Old West? Could it be from the 20s or 30s, either a bootlegger’s hideout, an old miner, sheepherder or a Great Depression crash pad? Or maybe the construction is from a more recent era, perhaps by hippies attempting to live off the land? If anyone has any answers to this mystery, let us know!
  10. I am searching for some cool abandoned places! I leave Las Vegas on September 5th so wanting to visit some old abandoned buildings, towns, vehicles, any military stuff, etc. I drive a Jeep that is somewhat built so looking for something way far out untouched by vandals and scum of the earth. I've found a few places listed and unlisted through aerial views but want some new stuff to explore. Thank you in advance for any information.
  11. My next series of videos will be based on a trip in 2000 that I took with Lew Shorb. Lew is a board member here, as well as owner of the popular website http://www.ghosttownexplorers.org/ghost.htm In breaking with my past habit of culling out historical sites and ghost towns and creating short videos dealing with these, I decided to keep the exploring part of Explore Forums in and create videos of each day of my travel and exploration, including our camps. Scenery, travel, camping ghost towns and wide open spaces. Part one of this series, as well as subsequent videos, will all appear here within this same thread. Part I will start in my garage, where I was finishing up with the packing my truck. The following day, after work, I begin my travels to meet Lew Shorb at Rhyolite, Nevada ghost town. Our three day, two night travels prowled about the "Nevada Triangle" section of northeastern Death Valley National Park; and will include such sites as: 1. The Las Vegas & Tonopah Railroad 2. Gold Bar 3. Phinney Mine 4. Strozzi Ranch 5. Currie Well (LV&T RR) 6. Mud Springs Summit (LV&T RR) 7. Happy Hooligan Mine This video, that of March 30th and 31st, will start off this series; and is brief, only being 3:28 long. Nevada-Triangle_Shorb-2000_Part-1.wmv So, below is my narrative of part one of this series to give full context of what is seen in the video. It will probably take longer to read than the video is long. -------------------------- Exploration Field Trips March 31-April 2, 2000 Into the Nevada Triangle with Lew Shorb Lew Shorb, of southern California, and I had been corresponding by email for quite some time, yet we had never met. Early in the year 2000, we finally did, when I went south to spend a couple days with a friend and his wife while he was recuperating after suffering major health problems. Since Lew and I both were avid history and off-road exploration fans, we started planning a trip together somewhere. Plans came to fruition March 30, 2000, when we met at the Red Barn in the ghost town of Bullfrog, Nevada. We planned to travel the "Nevada Triangle" of Death Valley National Park, using Lew’s GPS and THE EXPLORER’S GUIDE TO DEATH VALLEY NATIONAL PARK, by T. Scott and Betty Tucker Bryan, to navigate through some interesting and historic countryside for the weekend. Below is an account of our trip, based upon my transcribed verbal notes on microcassette. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Day 1 - March 30, 2000 Packed my truck after work. I lived in Ridgecrest, California at the time. Plans were still a bit sketchy, a meeting in Beatty, and dinner there was sort of the way we were going to start. Our trip itinerary was to visit the ghost town of Gold Bar in the Bullfrog District, Phinney Canyon Mine in the Grapevine Range, possibly go south to Carrara, then maybe into Death Valley and visit the site of Schwab in Echo Canyon. Lew was going to email me his final prospects that night. Due to technical problems with my ISP, I could not retrieve email. Day 2 - March 31, 2000 I attempted to retrieve my email early in the morning. Technical problems persisted, no email. Was Lew still coming, or would I be alone in the night in Rhyolite? So I decided my plan was to meet Lew [hopefully] at either at Beatty or Rhyolite after I got off work at the borax refinery in Trona, California. Things went downhill that morning before work while undergoing final preparations. While putting in final items into the back of the truck, I find that my air mattress, which had been pumped up a week before to check for leaks and had held air fine all week, was flat. My 5-gallon water jug, which had held a mix of water and a light dose of chlorine to clean and check for leaks for the past couple days, leaked out its entire contents overnight and made a big mess in the back of the truck and all over the garage floor. In my mind, the big blow would come this evening after work and driving to Rhyolite, and finding Lew would not be there; and that his email stating so was locked in the big machine of my ISP who was not giving me my email for the past two days due to their technical problems. At 5:45 P.M. I left work and left for Rhyolite. In case of another water jug failure, I purchased a few 1-gallon jugs of drinking water and ice before leaving Trona, as well as refilling my water jug. Not knowing the final plan on where to meet Lew, if he was to be out here at all, I started to call out for Lew periodically on my FRS two-way radio when I left Trona, just in case he was somewhere around waiting for me to get off work. The FRS was a new purchase specifically for this trip, and it has been a welcome tool since. Lew and I had already agreed on which channel to use for the trip. North winds were brisk leaving Searles Valley and advancing darkness made it colder. The winds died down when I entered Death Valley. Forecasts were calling for decreasing winds for the weekend. The temperature at Stovepipe Wells was a balmy 70º. Climbing out of Death Valley, my high beams suddenly went out, the daylight driving lights on my 1996 Chevrolet S-10 came on. I switched to low beams and they worked just fine. I reached for the headlight switch and found it was very hot. Great! No confirmation, no air in the mattress, no water in the jug. Now this. Topping Daylight Pass, I radioed once again for Lew. And I got an answer. Relief! Lew was waiting for me at the Red Barn in the Bullfrog townsite. He brought his son with him, plus a friend of his son. Though FRS radio manufacturers state that generally a radio range of two miles is maximum, Lew and I were chatting clearly at eight miles distance. Lew and I met at about 7:45 PM, then we drove a couple miles west and found a camp spot atop the Las Vegas & Tonopah Railroad grade. We both set up camp amid the blackness of the night and the chilly northern breeze - Lew and the boys would sleep in Lew’s Jeep Cherokee, myself in the back of my truck. Our vehicles were T-boned into each other on the railroad grade. I blew up my air mattress with my 12-volt compressor with hopes it might hold air at least for the night. I made me a meal of canned chicken, instant split pea soup and instant mashed potatoes with wine - relished while sitting on the tailgate dressed in a hooded sweatshirt with a jacket over it. Lew and the boys had hot dogs. Conversation to the light of several Coleman lanterns ran the gamut from history to finalizing our travel plans to GPS units. Lew showed me the remains of his favorite type of GPS - an old 486 laptop computer running Windows 95 and DeLorme Street Atlas USA, with a Garmin GPS unit plugged in. The CPU on the computer blew that afternoon, so Lew allowed the boys to have fun with the .22 rifle. Lew had picked up the pieces and bagged them for disposal later. It was a chilly night. At 10:50 PM I had enough for the day and turned into my camp within the bed of my truck. I had my oversize bag plus my wife’s sleeping bag opened and laid over mine for extra warmth. I’m glad that I had it. But I had forgotten my pillow. The chilly night and no pillow made for a night of tossing and turning and little sleep.
  12. Started My Explorations Yesterday

    Hi All, Found this forum this morning (thrilled I did) after checking out some spots I discovered yesterday on a little adventure I treated myself to. I started in Reno (where I live as of recent) and drove out to Battle Mountain. Then took the 50 down to Austin, NV and then back to Reno. They aren't joking when they call it the 'Loneliest Road in America...' Anyway, what I realized was that Nevada is really barren, but when you do find those old towns or buildings, it's such a rewarding feeling. I'm going to try and go for two days next weekend and try to find some abandoned towns like I've seen on this forum. I abide by the phrase "Take only pictures. Leave only footprints." I look forward to sharing my adventures with you all and finding some amazing new places to explore. -letsgetlost
  13. This is a place I have been eyeing for a long time, and I finally made it out there. This is only one episode and I imagine I will have about 5 or 6 episodes in total. We spent the entire day out at this place, and it still wasn't enough time to see everything. We only left because our stomachs were letting us know that we needed some food. The first part isn't overly exciting, but I really didn't expect to find a swimming pool and a kids playground! The lack of vandalism was also amazing! The kids playground is nearly in perfect shape, and I am betting the local residents actually built it themselves out of whatever they had sitting around at the time! I edited this video a little differently, so please let me know what you think about it.
  14. We found this place about two weeks ago, great site. I am not sure if the roads will still be passable as the area seemed to get some serious rain since we been there, but the road is fairly maintained up to the gate. At the gate, you have to hike about a mile, which isn't bad, but it's very steep terrain. We came around a corner and caught a glimpse of the massive operation. It was completely unexpected as we were really in the middle of nowhere. We did see an old outhouse and a few abandoned miners cabins on the way up. As we approached the stairs, we had to deliberate on whether to trust the stairs. They were solid up top, but were a little sketchy at the bottom. A video will be posted soon. Anyway, due to the amount of metal at this site, I will only reveal its location to Established Members who are interested in checking it out. I would hate to see this place ransacked by metal scrappers. This place was a really cool find. Street lamps, and a processing system with conveyor belts, classifiers, and much more. It looks like all you would need to do is hit the power button and you would be back in business! Anyone know what this place is called? The lack of vandalism was really unexpected. A look back up the stairs we just came down. We took a wrong turn and ended up at the top of the stairs! Coming down these stairs is a little sketchy as they are not attached at the bottom and are free floating. I am going to start bringing a drill, screws, nails, and hammer when I check these places out. It would be nice to try and help preserve these locations as much as possible.
  15. From the album Jessup Ghost Town Nevada

    A dead fox we came across when out exploring Jessup. No obvious signs of why this fox died were present.

    © Explore Forums

  16. We headed out on a loop from Wild Horse Reservoir to Jarbidge to Charleston. The ride is an amazing ride which I will add photos later, and we came across 6 rattlesnakes, 2 gopher snakes, 1 rubber boa, and 1 garter snake. The scenery on this trip was amazing, but I found Jarbidge to be less then impressive and it reminded me a lot of the small California towns in the Santa Cruz area. Anyway, we continued on from Jarbidge to Charleston, which I found is much different than the Charleston I see posted on many other websites. There was a sign outside of Charleston which identified it as Charleston, and of course I forgot to take a photograph of the sign, but we did go inside the old series of houses which were interconnected, or maybe it was one huge mansion. The house or series of houses were pretty amazing, built over a stream. You have to cross a wooden bridge to enter the house, and by the looks of the house, it was squatted in for a while before being abandoned again. Outside the house, it said "Gate Open, Inquire Within", but when we got up to the door, nobody was there. I called out a few times to make sure we the place was abandoned, and once we verified it was abandoned we started exploring the area. There was a table set for four, but you could tell by the dust, it had been set for a long time. We didn't disturb anything and left the place just like it was when we entered. There were no no-trespassing signs and nothing outside. In addition, the front door was ajar when we arrived. We took only photographs and left only footprints. Magazines were strewn about in strange locations, a bed and entire room was covered with wallpaper, with a bathtub at the foot of the bed. A cooler with what appeared to be dried blood was in the home, probably blood left over from a fish or other animal the squatter had killed. Overall, there was a ton of interesting stuff to see here, but we had to be very careful due to the amount of snakes. I have never seen so many snakes on a single drive before, and most of the rattle snakes didn't even have a single button yet. I will create a new gallery for the drive we made. I will attach my gallery of the area instead of posting individual photos since some people have a hard time downloading them on slower connections. This is the type of area I look for when exploring. This made the entire trip worth the gas money.
  17. The People of Seven Troughs & Mazuma Thanks to recent postings by our members, we have gained a lot of valuable information about the towns of Seven Troughs and Mazuma. We have learned about the devastating flood of 1912 that raged through the canyons, wiping out structures and taking a number of lives with it, as well as explored the small cemeteries that mark the landscape with many unmarked graves. Now, we are going to uncover the stories behind some of those who lived in these towns, those who brought life and personality to the dusty streets and desert beaten buildings and homes. As a note of reference, the remains of the flood victims were taken to the funeral parlors of Groesbeck and O'Brien in Mazuma. Below is an account given by P.E. Groesbeck, undertaker… MAZUMA DEATH LIST FIXED AT 9 PERSONS AND LOSS $100,000. BRING REMAINS OF VICTIMS TO THIS CITY. ONE CHILD IS STILL AMONG THE MISSING. P. E. GROESBECK RETURNS FROM SCENE OF TRAGEDY AND GIVES DETAILS OF DISASTER. “Lovelock, July 20. -- The list of dead in the Mazuma disaster still remains at nine persons and nine were injured. Additional details fix the approximate loss due to the flood at about $100,000. P. E. Groesbeck of the undertaking firm of Groesbeck and O'Brien of this city returned from the scene of the flood-stricken Mazuma district this morning. "I reached Lovelock about 3 o'clock Friday morning in response to a call sent out from that place. I found no automobiles or other conveyances awaiting, and, known that the services of an undertaker would be one of the crying necessities of the hour, proceeded toward Mazuma on foot. The first automobile which I found returning from Mazuma I stopped and, explaining the situation to the driver, he consented to take me back." "We got into Mazuma about 8 o'clock Friday morning, accompanied by a nurse and my assistant, a Mr. Bird of the Coalition Mining company. I met the officials of the mining companies, who in turn took me to the building where the remains of MRS.RUDDELL, MRS. FONCANNON, MICHAEL WHALEN, the youngest KEHOE boy and the 6-year-old son of MR. GILLESPIE of the Mazuma Hills Mining company had been placed." "The condition of all these bodies was terrible to behold. They were bruised from head to foot and were almost completely beyond recognition. The bodies were entirely denuded when found. They were covered with debris, dirt and sand. some of the bodies, were picked up several miles from the place of residence." "Many of the escapes from death were miraculous. The flood apparently came without warning and swept down on the victims in a moment. Many of the survivors had to be held back from rushing into the flood in an effort to rescue minor effects." "MICHAEL KEHOE had just retired when the flood struck the building. He jumped from his bed and ran to the door. He saw the body of the smallest KEHOE boy float by him on the crest of the flood and lost his life trying to save the lad." "The entire town, with the exception of one or two buildings located high on the hill, was wiped out. The Coalition Mining company lost nearly its entire plant and its big vault where in the neighborhood of $20,000 worth of bullion was stored. The bullion was all lost." "One of the KEHOE children still is missing. There is no doubt but what the unfortunate child is dead. The remains are either covered with debris or have been buried in the mud." "The remains of MRS. RUDDELL and MRS. FONCANNON were brought to Reno this morning and will not be disposed of until instructions are received from relatives. The remains of WHALEN will be brought to Reno to await the coming of his mother, who has started from his home in Illinois to take charge of them." "The property loss is estimated in the neighborhood of $100,000." Casualties as known: GEORGE S. KEHOE, aged 4 years old. JAMES C. KEHOE, aged 6 years old. RONALD M. KEHOE, aged 1 1/2 years old. JULIA FONCANNON, wife of Floyd. PERRV GILLESPIE, son of Matthew, 10 years old. MRS. KEHOE, wife of William. MRS. McCLEAN, wife of Alex. MARGARET O'HANLON, wife of Steve. MAUDE EDNA RUDDELL, aged 33 years. JOHN TRENCHARD. MICHAEL WHALEN, aged 45 years. Reno Evening Gazette Nevada 1912-07-20” Now on to those who lived, worked and died in the towns of Seven Troughs and Mazuma. Matthew M. Gillespie, born January 25th, 1875 and Sara Mayne Heron, born circa 1884, were immigrants from Northern Ireland. The maiden name of Matthew’s mother was Burns. Arriving first in Canada in 1905, where son Thomas Perry Gillespie was born in May 1906, they soon made their way down to Oakland, Alameda County, California, where son Richard H. was born May 15th, 1909. The 1910 census enumerates this family as living in Berkeley, Alameda County, California. The household consists of Matthew, wife Sara, and sons Thomas and Richard. Matthew’s occupation is listed as manager for a mining company, and at this time he and Sarah had been married for a period of four years. In 1911 the family moved to Mazuma, Nevada, but by 1912 were planning to move back to Oakland, California. On July 18th, 1912 a flash flood tore through the towns of Seven Troughs and Mazuma, washing away buildings and humans alike. Thomas Gillespie, just 6 years old, was one of the victims who drowned in the flood. The family had his body sent to Oakland, California, where he lies buried in the Mountain View Cemetery. A newspaper article in the Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, NJ), July 20th, 1912, provides us with further information… “While saving his wife, Dr. Gillespie, the superintendent of the Daily Mining Reduction Works at Mazuma, was compelled to see his oldest son drown. If he had let go his wife to save the son the wife would have drowned, and although the mother tried to prevail upon the physician to let her drown in order that her boy might live, the husband clung to his wife and finally got her out of danger,” One can only imagine with horror and compassion the trauma and long lasting after-affects of this incident in the life of this family. No other children were born to this family, even though both Matthew and Sara were still young enough, which makes me wonder about how the dynamics in their relationship may have changed after the death of young Thomas. In 1920 the family are living back in Oakland, California, with the household consisting of Matthew, Sara and son Richard. By this time Matthew was working as an importer. The 1930 census for Oakland shows the same information. In 1935 Matthew and Sara were living in Berkeley, California, and by 1940 they had moved to Contra Costa, California. Matthew Gillespie was naturalized as an American citizen in 1944. Sara Mayne Heron Gillespie was naturalized in 1948. Matthew died in Alameda County, California on May 17th, 1949. So far no record of death has been found for Sara or son Richard. John S. Keheo, born in Illinois on December 26th, 1864 and Mary “Mamie” J. Lewis, born in Colorado on December 2nd, 1884. A record of marriage, conducted in Cripple Creek, Colorado, states that John Kehoe (NOT Keheo!) married Mamie Lewis on November 27th, 1901. Known children were Lewis, born 1904 in Colorado, Cletus, born 1906 in Colorado, George, born 1908 in Nevada, and Ronald, born 1910 in Nevada, John M. born 1914 in Nevada, and Baby Keheo, born and died 1916 in Nevada. The 1910 census for Lassen, California enumerates the family, consisting of John, Mamie, Lewis, Cletus and George. Son Ronald would be born in 1910, after the enumeration of the census. In 1912 the family were living in Mazuma, Nevada, and were unfortunate enough to be in the path of the flood of July 18th. For the Kehoe family the losses would be extremely tragic. Three of their sons, Cletus, George and Ronald, would be swept away and drowned, along with their friend Thomas Gillespie, who had been visiting with them at the time. Mother Mamie was also feared to be dead, but was found alive. Unsurprisingly, the family left the Seven Troughs / Mazuma area, moving roughly 27 miles away to Lovelock, Nevada, where son John was born in 1914. In 1916 another child was born, who died so soon after birth that the little one was buried without a name. In the 1920 census enumeration for Lovelock, Nevada the family are recorded under the misspelling of Kehab, instead of Kehoe or Keheo. The members in the household are John, Mamie, Lewis and Jack (John, Jr.). In 1930 John is enumerated at a different address from his wife and son, possibly because he was living away from home for employment reasons. His wife and son are recorded under the misspelling of Mamie and John Kehoa. Both John and Mamie state that they are married. Son Lewis is listed as living in Reno, Nevada, lodging with the family of Victor Spencer. His first name is spelled as Louis. Lewis married Florence Brown in 1935. In 1940 Mamie is enumerated in Lovelock, Nevada with son John, Jr and mother Mary O’Hanley. Mamie states that she is divorced. Ex-husband John is listed at a different address, where he is working as a ranch hand. He makes the declaration that he is still married. I think this gives us a good idea regarding which of the two wanted the divorce. Son Lewis is enumerated in Lovelock, living with wife Florence and sons John and William. John died November 5th, 1956, and is buried in the Lone Mountain Cemetery in Lovelock. Mamie died in April 30th 1974 in Solano, California, and is buried in Lone Mountain Cemetery in Lovelock, Nevada. Son Lewis died at Vallejo, Solano, California on September 15th, 1980. Son John disappears from the records after the 1940 census. John Trenchard, one of those who was in the flood at Mazuma, and died 17 hours later, was born August 18th, 1858, at Fairton, Cumberland County, New Jersey. His parents were Theophilus Trenchard and Sarah. John married Ida Mayhew, daughter of Daniel & Caroline (ALLEN) Mayhew, and sometime in 1899, after the birth of son John, they moved West with their family. An article in the Bridgeton Evening News (Bridgeton, NJ), dated August 26th, 1899, tells us that John and family were living in Colorado, where John suffered losses to his furniture business in the Great Fire of Victor, Colorado. They do not appear in the 1900 census, which leads me to believe that they were again on the move at that time. They eventually settled in Los Angeles, California, where they were enumerated in the 1910 census, along with children Caroline, Sarah and John. Not listed was daughter Catherine, who was an adult and lived elsewhere. In 1910 John was also enumerated in Mazuma, where he was conducting business as a merchant. By 1912 the family would be living at Mazuma. After the flood a number of news reports were sent by telegram to their family members back in New Jersey and reported in the local newspapers. Wife Ida lived until after 1940, as she was enumerated in the 1940 census for San Mateo, California. Maude Edna Ruddell was a sister of Mrs. Reese, who was married to Dr. Reese. It has been reported that both Dr. and Mrs. Reese and their five children were killed in the flood. The newspapers of the time reported that Maude was a native of Canada, but according to her great-grandson, Tim Ruddell, she was born in Indiana. Another fallacy is that she is one of the victims buried in the little cemetery at Seven Troughs. Again, great-grandson Tim corrects this erroneous information and informs us that she is actually buried in an unmarked grave at Mountain View Cemetery in Reno, Nevada. Maude was born as Maude Edna Buckles in South Bend, Indiana in 1879, a daughter of Francis Marion Buckles and Minnie Whiteman. Reno Evening Gazette July 25, 1912 Page Three MAZUMA POSTMISTRESS FUNERAL HELD TODAY “Sad and impressive were the services held this morning over the remains of Miss Maude Edna Ruddell whose funeral took place from the mortuary parlors of Groesbeck & O'Brien on West Second Street. The deceased was postmistress at Mazuma and she was one of the victims of the disastrous flood there, which carried nine people to their deaths. Miss Ruddell was aged 33 years. Rev. Samuel Unsworth officiated at the funeral. The interment took place in Mountain View Cemetery.” TO BE CONTINUED! @ 2013 Cindy Nunn. All Rights Reserved. Large_Article_1907.pdf Large_Article_1908.pdf Large_Article_b_1908.pdf John_Trenchard_2.pdf John_Trenchard_3.pdf John_Trenchard_4.pdf Mazuma_High_Ground.pdf Seven_Troughs_1.pdf Seven_Troughs_2.pdf Seven_Troughs_3.pdf Seven_Troughs_4.pdf Seven_Troughs_5.pdf Seven_Troughs_6.pdf
  18. We decided to head up to Star City to see what was left, and all we could find is a bunch of old rock ruins of a once bustling mining camp. Here is the main site: ?do=embed' frameborder='0' data-embedContent> ?do=embed' frameborder='0' data-embedContent> 11 images 0 comments I wanted to hike up the road a bit to where these two tall trees are standing just over the ridge. They scream old home site, at least to me, but with the temps nearing 103 degrees, nobody in the car was up for the hike!
  19. St. Thomas: A high-and-dry ghost town STEVE MARCUS Dean and Edie Hiedeman of Henderson look over the remains of the schoolhouse at the town of St. Thomas in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area Monday, July 22, 2013. The town started as a farming settlement in 1865 but was covered by the rising waters of Lake Mead in the 1930’s after the construction of Hoover Dam. By Matt Hufman (contact) Sunday, Sept. 15, 2013 | 10 a.m. Finding Nevada Population: Today, zero. At its height, 500 — with up to 1,500 in the area. Location: About seven miles southeast of Overton. From Las Vegas, about 65 miles northeast via Interstate 15 and the Valley of Fire Highway. It’s in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, which requires an entry fee. GPS: 36.466247°, -114.370517° Elevation: 1,166 feet St. Thomas is known for one thing: It was the town that was flooded in 1938 by Hoover Dam. The history is much richer than that, and in recent years, people have been able to explore it. Due to the recent drought, the water that once covered the site — about 60 feet deep — is gone, and you can scramble down to the site and wander among the foundations, cisterns and tamarisk. The story of St. Thomas is, in many ways, the story of Nevada — hearty pioneers came to try to make a living here and when things didn’t work, they moved on. The town was eventually given up for something with better benefits — Hoover Dam. The town was founded by Mormon pioneers in 1865 and named after one of the expedition’s leaders, Thomas Sassen Smith. The group was sent by Brigham Young to grow cotton and open a supply route to Utah via the Colorado River. The pioneers suffered several hardships, heat, malaria-infested mosquitoes and scorpions. They dug miles of irrigation canals but found the cotton didn’t grow well. There were also some conflicts with local Indians. But what pushed the Mormon pioneers out was a tax bill presented by Lincoln County officials after an 1870 survey put St. Thomas in Nevada. Residents thought they were in Utah or Arizona. Nevada didn’t relent on the issue, and Young blessed the group’s return. All but one left. The town was taken over by a variety of settlers, including outlaws and others looking for a remote place to hide out. But Mormons would return to the area and resettle it, trying a variety of crops and taking advantage of its position on the road from Los Angeles to Salt Lake City. It was a stop on what became known as the Arrowhead Trail with a bridge that crossed the Muddy River. Motorists in the early 1900s could cruise through, finding a broad, leafy boulevard with a hotel, cafe and able mechanics. But the bust of nearby mines in the early 1900s hurt the town economically, and then the bridge was destroyed in a fire in the 1920s. With the plans for Hoover Dam taking shape, a new bridge was built to the north, along with the new highway, away from where Lake Mead would take shape. Residents fought the federal government to no avail and complained about what they said was the government’s low payments for their properties. Nearly all of the residents left well before the lake flooded the town, but there were a few people who denied that the lake would rise that high. The last of those was Hugh Lord, who woke to water at the foot of his bed one morning. He gathered his things and before climbing into his rowboat, set fire to his house. Why? The histories don’t say, but it seems like a fitting Nevada way out — one last shake of the fist at the federal government, which might force him out but couldn’t take everything he had. If you go: St. Thomas is on the edge of the Lake Mead National Recreation Area. An entry fee is required. A dirt road leads from just inside the park gate, southeast of the intersection of Valley of Fire Highway and North Lakeshore Road, and goes about 3.5 miles to a parking area. (Bring water, there are no facilities at the trailhead.) A trail descends from the parking area to the valley floor. It’s a little more than a half-mile to the edge of the town site. The loop trail runs about 2.5 miles. The St. Thomas Cemetery, which was moved before the lake was flooded, is off Highway 169 just outside of Overton. It is on the west side of the highway, just north of the Simplot facility. The Lost City Museum, which features artifacts from nearby Anasazi Indian ruins which were flooded by Lake Mead, is north of the cemetery off Highway 169. Remember: It’s against federal law to use a metal detector or take anything. And park staff frowns on climbing on the foundations. (Sorry.) For more: “St. Thomas: A History Uncovered,” by Aaron McArthur, will be published in November. It will be the history of the town, and it focuses on the Mormon roots. The book comes out of work McArthur did for the National Park Service, which then led to a Ph.D. dissertation at UNLV. It’s a solid, well-researched and readable history. Links: The National Park Service’s site is here. http://www.lasvegassun.com/features/finding-nevada/2013/sep/15/st-thomas-high-and-dry-ghost-town/
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