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Davus402

Big Bend camping.

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 With a three day weekend coming up I decided I need to go camping. I have never camped at Big Bend before and thought I would give it a try. B B is pretty much out of the way and the least visited of all the national parks in the lower 48. It has several developed camp grounds (which were full) and many backcountry sites, and a lodge in the basin area (which is full too). I decided to give it a go at one of the back country sites near the ghost town of Glen Springs. Leaving home about 6 am I headed south.

 A cold front had blown in during the night and the change in temperatures was creating some neat clouds over the mountains.

 Santiago peak. Named for the man killed by Comanche indians and buried at the base.

I think this is called an inversion layer cloud formation.

I started down Old Ore Road. The road was used to haul ore out of the Puerto Rico mine in Mexico. The ore was carried by overhead tram from Mexico, over the Rio Grande, and six miles into the U.S. where it was loaded into wagons, and taken to the railroad in Marathon 80 or so miles north.

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Old Ore Road is 26 miles long.

The northern part is the worst.

Lots of scenery.... desert scenery.

The road is nothing extreme. Rated as easy to moderate, I would not recommend it for 2 wheel drive. The basin high country is in the clouds.

I actually ran a couple of washes in 4 Lo, just to try it out.

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 The pictures do not do the road justice, they seldom do.

it always seems much steeper in reality.

 Ruins of a cabin. I don't know any history of it.

 I got plenty of pinstripes from this road.

 This would be a great pour off if it was raining.

It never looks as steep in pictures.

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 The last 1/3 of the road it smooths out.

More desert views.

Finally getting near the end. There are several camp sites along the road.... none with shade, in fact none of the back country sites have shade.

I finally hit pavement and headed to the park headquarters to get my camping permit.

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The Glen Springs camp site was taken, so I got one called Robbers Roost. A few miles north, but still close enough for me to stop and explore the ruins of Glen Springs.

The springs proper. Just a little north of the townsite.

Remains of the Comption home.

This is the most extensive remains left. This is the boiler and water tank location.

Stairs.

Not sure on why the horseshoe imprint.

The spring still flows, there is water down there.

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Getting late in the afternoon I headed to camp.

Not much to do but snap some pictures.

Looking towards Glenn Springs.

Storm clouds in Mexico, looks like a shark to me. Lightning flashes were awesome once the sun set.

 Once the sun set I would see a light coming from this mountain. Just about the center of the picture. I also saw another light from a mountain in Mexico. There are no towns or roads that way. Spooky.

 

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Sunset.

The basin area.

Looking east of camp.

Almost dark. Once the sun set there were several lights in the surrounding mountains. The lights went from bright to dim numerous times, and finally went out for good about an hour after the sun went down. There was a vehicle driving either down the Glenn Springs road or coming up the road to my camp and it's lights were way different than the lights in the mountains. I'm sure the mountain lights were man made, but who was making them and how did they get up there.

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Awesome trip, how are you liking the new ride? Did you cringe when you started hearing the brunches creating the new pinstripes?

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The Xterra is great. I've have hit the hitch a few times, and nearly ripped off one of the rear mudflaps. I did install rocksliders last week, and have a full set of new skidplates. It was unnerving scraping the sides up, most have buffed out ok. 

I'm still looking for new tires. The stock ones have held up. I did spin them in a few places, but satisfied with them so far.

I slept really good. Except for the crickets the night was quiet.

Sunrise was wonderful.

One of the lights was from this mountain.

The other was from the high mountain in the distance.

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After breaking camp I headed home.

The road out was fun, more pinstripes.

I decided to head up to the basin on the way out.

The basin in much higher and cooler than the surrounding desert and attracts the most visitors.

The cut is called the window, and has a hiking trail leading to it. There is a lodge, restraunt ,general store, and developed campground here. 

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Abandoned ranch.

I don't have any history of this location.

Lots of abandoned structures along road.

 I had a good trip. I need to get down there more often you just can't see it all in two days. I hope to get back down there again next month.

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Outstanding stuff. Those sunrise and sunset pics are the best..to me anyway. I love the solitude they convey, the feeling of smallness, but the sense of belonging to the world as well.

Those moments, when it all comes together like that are very special. Almost magic.

thanks for sharing.

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Davus, Big Bend is a unique region. Thanks for highlighting the ghost towns there. Did you get shots of the region's unique fauna too?

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Thanks all. I did not see any critters save for one roadrunner which came up to my camp and watched me set up the tent. He sat about three feet away the whole time. It was very quiet and peaceful. The night time sky is second to none. This is starting the busy season for the park, the lodge is booked well into next year. I recommend a visit to anyone who like solitude and desert views. 

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Thanks all. I did not see any critters save for one roadrunner which came up to my camp and watched me set up the tent. He sat about three feet away the whole time. 

Always good to make friends with the locals. It often comes in handy for me. 

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