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OldSoul

Abandoned cemetery

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My husband and I stumbled across this cemetery on a drive through the log truck trails near our home about six months ago and intended to return. We went back this weekend and the property has been fenced and posted "No Trespassing". I am going to attempt to get permission to roam around. We spoke to somebody else who was in the area and they informed us that there is an entire ghost town out there and that some of the grave sites date back to the 1800's. So, cross your fingers in hopes that I will be able to find the owners of the property and that they will allow us to explore. 

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Awesome!!  Please create a post when you have the time if you get the permission.  I'd love to know the name of the ghost town and a brief history of it.  Looks like the Muscogee, Florida Cemetery.  But that's across the state line in Florida.  here's a pic of the lumbertown's cemetery I found:  http://aliceshalloweenfun.homestead.com/100_1475_op_800x600.jpg

If so, I'd also like to contact the owner and get permission.  Muscogee, Fl is high on my list.  

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4 hours ago, dery said:

Awesome!!  Please create a post when you have the time if you get the permission.  I'd love to know the name of the ghost town and a brief history of it.  Looks like the Muscogee, Florida Cemetery.  But that's across the state line in Florida.  here's a pic of the lumbertown's cemetery I found:  http://aliceshalloweenfun.homestead.com/100_1475_op_800x600.jpg

If so, I'd also like to contact the owner and get permission.  Muscogee, Fl is high on my list.  

Will do. Do I make a post the same way I did this? I know my way around nature pretty well. Techy stuff, not so much. Looks like I'm going to have to do some serious digging on this one. I'll keep you all updated. This is just North of Styx River in Rosinton, AL on Truck Trail 17.

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Just be as nice as possible when asking for permission, hopefully you won't have any trouble. If they are unsure, ask whomever you are getting permission from to be there with you.

Seen this on some videos where owner or caretaker of a property tagged along.

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14 hours ago, wimc said:

Just be as nice as possible when asking for permission, hopefully you won't have any trouble. If they are unsure, ask whomever you are getting permission from to be there with you.

Seen this on some videos where owner or caretaker of a property tagged along.

Always, wimc. I'm sure if I can track the owners down I won't have any problem getting permission. The area is known for young kids getting drunk and being destructive so this is most likely only to protect the history of this cemetery from bored teenagers. The problem seems to be finding the owners of the property. But, I have a few more sources I plan to check with. If nothing else, when I get a chance I will go back out with my Canon and see if I can at least get some more interesting photos. 

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