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Bob

Abandoned Mine California

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Oh, thanks folks.  :)  I'm trying this "Explore and put it on y00t00b" thing now, too.  It's actually kinda cool.  Once I got past the initial frustrations of my video editing software, and more importantly after getting some excellent advice from Bob, it's turning out to be fun.

I'm not focusing only on abandoned places, though - mostly because in California they are impossible to reach, many have been destroyed, or often sit on private property.  So I figured I'd post vids of stuff I do hobby-wise and which might be useful to other people. 

I think the biggest issue for me is time.  Between work, family time, exercise, and getting out and doing stuff, I'm usually too burned out in the evening to focus on video stuff.  Still, I find it to be fun and rewarding. :)

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That truck looks close.  A few things are different on the hood cowling and windshield, but overall it fits.  Plus, it would make sense to find surplus military vehicles on an old ranch.  Next time I'm out there, which I hope will be a couple of weeks, I'll go back and take a closer look. 

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10 minutes ago, desertdog said:

That truck looks close.  A few things are different on the hood cowling and windshield, but overall it fits.  Plus, it would make sense to find surplus military vehicles on an old ranch.  Next time I'm out there, which I hope will be a couple of weeks, I'll go back and take a closer look. 

 Yeah, I recognized it right away as a power wagon  and it's pretty close. It may be a different year but it looks like a PW. 

GM, Ford and Dodge all three made military vehicles during WWII 

heres another photo of the Dodge

 

 

IMG_5511.PNG

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Only difference I noted is the fuel tank (from the above picture).  The truck I found had its tank between the rear frame rails.  It sure would be neat to have one of those old trucks.  My grandad had a 1940 Ford pickup for years when I was little, but he got rid of it before I was old enough to drive. 

All I remember, specs-wise, is it had an inline 6 and a 6V system with a dinky little battery.  The air cleaner (don't recall if it was an oil bath or not) looked nearly identical to the air cleaner on the truck I found.  But that may have just been a question of semi-standardization, too. 

It would have been a neat truck to convert to 4WD and do a moderate restoration on.  It was in good shape in the early 80's - even the upholstery was pristine (it was this Christmas tree green color, maybe a tad lighter) and had a really neat shifter knob.  :)

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    Heck, I'd love to have my first pickup truck or car too. 1st truck was a 1947 Chevy three window 3100. My first car was a 54 Chevy sedan my brother couldn't get running. He GAVE it to me and a buddy had a 54 that had been side swiped in a wreck but ran good. Swapped out motors and squatted that thing right on the ground!!  Both had the inline 6 stovebolt.

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Talked to some other users of the property this past weekend.  They've had torrential rains in that area since I made that video - access is totally gone now. 

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Forgot to add - since the property is also an active cattle ranch (longhorns!), the owners will be in there with a dozer and a grader once the rainy season is over and the road will be fixed.  That's good, because then I'll have a shortcut to the next mine I want to check out in late spring.  Assuming I'm allowed to leave the house. :)

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That's good news they will be fixing the road. The roads out here have been decimated too by the storms. I really need to get myself a UTV. 

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On 2/9/2017 at 8:31 AM, Bob said:

That's good news they will be fixing the road. The roads out here have been decimated too by the storms. I really need to get myself a UTV. 

Keep me posted on that.  I've got my bike setup and ready, just lack the ambition to deal with mud/cold so I'm wating for a few weeks of dry and temps in the mid 50's...

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