Jump to content
Explore Forums
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  1. ElPolvo

    ElPolvo

  • Similar Content

    • By coyote
      Short little video of an explore I made a few weeks ago. I've been meaning to post this for some time but was overcome by a lot of RL events with work & stuff. But I am starting a series of videos on the Oregon Trail as it came through Boise, and one of those videos includes the tiny town of Mayfield, Idaho. I read about it in a newspaper and saw that there is going to be a concerted effort to develop the area around the old town site and figured I should collect some images while I could. I found a really cool region close to my home that I knew nothing about, so I may go out there again for more videos.
      Anyhow, here's a link for the interested and I'll try to pick up the pace and do more than one video a month!
       
    • By EndicottExplorer
      I heard about Elberton from a couple of townfolk in the nearby small town of Garfield, WA.  It wasn't until this past summer that I finally got a chance to explore and find the once thriving town, now not so much.  Only a handful of structures remain from what once was a 200 acre, 500 person town in a draw along the Oregon-Washington Railroad (no longer used).  The town was evidently started by a man named C.D. Wilbur and named after his son Elbert.  Due to several catastrophic events (a fire and the great depression to follow), the town began a rapid decline and is now down to about 15 full-time residents.  Whitman County bought the townsite and made a park there with hiking trail and other paths through the ruins in 1970.  The most prominant reminders of what once was are the in-tact Church (United Brethren, I believe) and the perennial gardens from homesteads past that continue to grow in the Spring.  Below are a few pictures of what you see there now. 
       


    • By nvexpeditions
      Toyah takes its name from an Indian word meaning 'flowing water'. It is the oldest townsite in Reeves County, and began as a trading post for ranches in
      the area. Prior to the Texas and Pacific Railway's arrival, W.T. Youngblood and his family arrived in a covered wagon and opened an adobe store. In
      1881, Toyah saw first train and a post office was open. By the end of the year, Toyah had tents, saloons, restaurants, and a six-times weekly stage
      service provided by the Overland Transportation Company connecting to Fort Stockton and Fort Davis. In 1886, the A.M. Fields Hotel was opened, and in
      1894 Toyah's first school was built.
      By 1910, Toyah had a population of 771 and had become an important cattle shipping point (although the shipping point soon moved to Toyahvale, some 25
      miles south as the crow flies). A handsome new brick school was erected in 1912, and by 1914 Toyah had over a thousand residents, where it remained
      until the Crash of 1929.
      Two years later, only 553 remained in Toyah, and only 17 businesses were open. Since then, Toyah has been in a steady decline. By 2010, only 90 people
      remained in the quiet town. The school building has been abandoned for decades, and the majority of the business district was leveled by a tornado in
      2004.
      Toyah School, built 1912

      Ruins of the old Bank

      Toyah Christian Church

      Toyah Baptist Church, est 1903

      For more Toyah photos, check out my Toyah album.
       
       
    • By Caleb
      I am searching for some cool abandoned places! I leave Las Vegas on September 5th so wanting to visit some old abandoned buildings, towns, vehicles, any military stuff, etc.  I drive a Jeep that is somewhat built so looking for something way far out untouched by vandals and scum of the earth. I've found a few places listed and unlisted through aerial views but want some new stuff to explore.  Thank you in advance for any information.
    • By David A. Wright
      Exploration Field Trips:
      May 1-3, 2000
      Trip with Alan Patera and Alan Hensher into Death Valley
      What do you do with three authors, two 4x4’s, two two-way radios, three cameras, and camping supplies? Send them to Death Valley, of course. For three days in the first week of May, 2000, fellow authors and historical researchers Alan Patera, Alan Hensher and myself explored Death Valley north and south.
      Alan Patera writes and publishes the WESTERN PLACES series of monograph books.  Alan Hensher has been published in several periodicals as well as authoring several books, centering primarily on the history of Mojave Desert sites.
      Alan Patera, who hails from Oregon, came south to California and picked up Alan Hensher; then the two came my way. At the time I was living in Ridgecrest, California. After overnighting with my wife and I, the three of us took off for Death Valley.  Alan was busy researching and photographing for a future edition of WESTERN PLACES, this time centering on the camps of the Funeral Range, which forms the eastern border of east central Death Valley.  Circumstances and changes of our journey lead Alan to plant the seeds of two more future books, this time centering just outside the northernmost section of Death Valley.
      Below is a thumbnail sketch of the trip, based upon transcripts of my verbal notes on microcassette and photos.  There will be a video and narrative for each day of the trip in this thread.
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Day 1 - May 1, 2000
      The first video in the series covers our travels on May 1, 2000.  The video is 37:19 long.  The video link to Part I is at:
      trip-2000_pt-1.wmv
      This time around, at the end of the video I added a photo slide show of my favorite images taken during the day, along with a little mood music.  To maintain context in the video and give details not seen in it, a narrative is given below. 
      I rose early Monday morning, May 1st, the two Alan’s did not. The three of us had stayed up until well past midnight talking history, swapping files, photos and notes. I made last minute checks and additions to my gear and food while they slept in. An hour after we had planned to leave, we still had not yet done so. Our trip started at Denny’s in Ridgecrest, California, six blocks from my home. I had purchased an additional FRS radio for Alan Patera to use to keep us linked while traveling.  However, it turned out that Alan Hensher often sat on it much of the first part of the first day; prompting me to jokingly request he not do so because I was tired of anal transmissions from him.
      A bit after 9:00 AM, we left Denny’s and pointed our grills toward Reilly ghost town site, located at the foot of the Argus Range in west-central Panamint Valley. The weather was clear with thin high clouds, a good day to go exploring. Entering Trona, we passed a number of bicyclists, loaded with camping gear, obviously going to Death Valley.
      Passing out of Searles Valley and into Panamint, our first stop was to be Reilly. Not knowing where Reilly was but having some idea of where to look and a pair of binoculars, we made a few false starts up some desert roads before finally finding the right one. The two Alan’s and I were impressed with our tour of Reilly. Stone ruins, tin cans, water pipe and other detritus lay everywhere the eye could see.
      Reilly was a minor mill camp, an outgrowth of the mining activity that centered on several Panamint Range canyons to the northeast, as well as the Darwin boom to the northwest in the 1890s.  Mineral was found in 1875, but languished due to its location for another seven years until Charles Anthony interested a New York capitalist by the name of Edward Reilly in buying claims.  Reilly formed the Argus Range Silver Mining Company and sold stock.  Charles Anthony took care of daily operations at the growing camp.  Soon a 10-stamp mill was built as well as a camp to house employees.  A post office was opened in January, 1883.  The camp had no water of its own, so the company built a pipeline southward and then westward up a nearby canyon.  Other hurdles soon created dull times in camp and the post office closed even before the mill began operations.  However, late in 1883 and early in 1884, the mill – which took up the name of the Anthony Mill – began crushing ore.  Mines on nearby hillsides eventually petered out, but the Anthony Mill was kept running by doing custom work for nearby mines.
      The three of us enjoyed touring the fairly extensive ruins of Reilly and the Anthony Mill.  At the time of our trip, my plans for later in the month was to be part of an archeological dig at the site conducted by the BLM.  We left Reilly as it was beginning to warm up, being close to 90º, yet snow still lay on the shady slopes of the Panamint Range.
      Running up Wildrose Canyon, I noticed that a patch of Panamint daisies were still in bloom. Panamint daisies grow only in this and a couple nearby canyons.  Unlike its far more common cousin, the Mojave daisy, the Panamint variety has a far larger flower and blooms very infrequently.  On this trip, we would find cactus and wildflowers blooming above about 3,000 feet.
      Our two vehicle caravan continued to climb Wildrose Canyon, then crossed over the Emigrant Pass and Harrisburg Flat country and then dropped into the head of Emigrant Canyon.  There stopped at an unmarked spot to view a set of petroglyphs that are invisible in plain sight, if you know where to look.  On a nearby rock face is a faint, chisled inscription of a name and a date that appears to be made by somebody named Haworth or Hayworth in 1855.  Weathered and difficult to read, the three of us studied and debated.  I had pondered it several times in previous years, this was the first time for both Alan’s.
      Reaching Death Valley, we stopped at Furnace Creek. There, the official thermometer at the visitor center read an even 100°.  Alan Patera had an order of WESTERN PLACES books to drop off.
      I also wanted to meet with Death Valley National Park ranger, Dave Brenner, an acquaintance of mine; with whom in the past I’ve had the enjoyable experience of riding along with him on his patrol rounds. The Park Service was having service awards and knew he’d be around somewhere. I also wanted to meet Mark H., who was an employee of the park also; Mark being quite prolific on the Internet Death Valley bulletin boards under the handle "Tumbleweed." I found both at the same time and we stood outside the visitor center in the warm afternoon.  I spent over a half hour talking with Dave about the recent controversy over the "Death Valley Bunk Trunk," in which an individual claimed to have found a trunk left behind by the Jayhawker part on their ill fated trek of 1849.  That made nationwide attention and was ultimately proven to be a hoax.
      While we were talking, Alan Hensher came out of the visitor center with a bag full of books, among them PROCEEDINGS FOURTH DEATH VALLEY CONFERENCE ON HISTORY AND PREHISTORY - FEBRUARY 2-5, 1995; PROCEEDINGS FIFTH DEATH VALLEY CONFERENCE ON HISTORY AND PREHISTORY - MARCH 4-7, 1999. He made a gift of copies for me and Alan Patera.
      While at Furnace Creek, we took the opportunity to top off our gas tanks at the Chevron station.  We paid a high price of $1.91 per gallon.
      After visiting with Dave and Mark, the two Alan’s and I found a shady spot on the side of the road near the Furnace Creek Ranch and fixed ourselves a late lunch. Then it was off to our first ghost town to prowl, the Inyo Mine, located in Echo Canyon in the southern Funeral Range.  Also part of the Funeral Range mining boom in the early years of the 20th century was the ghost of Schwab, not far from the Inyo Mine.  Alan Patera and I had a year previous visited the camps on the eastern side of the range, which is chronicled on this website in my series of videos dealing with Keane Spring, Chloride City, the Capricorn Mine and the townsites of Lee, California and Lee, Nevada; with Lee Annex in between.
      Echo Canyon winds its way easily up into the Funeral Range. It’s easily passable by any truck based 4x4. On our trip, a two-wheel-drive vehicle could have made it, except for one spot at the mouth of the canyon where the road dropped into a hole with a couple of bedrock boulders in it. Just enough to cause the chassis to flex, lifting up each tire off the ground as our vehicles passed by it. Along the way is the Eye of the Needle, a triangular hole in a large thumb of rock projecting up from the canyon floor. Continuing up the canyon we started driving through swarms of wasps or hornets that flew with their abdomens downward as if they were flying straight up. They came in through my open windows, making driving and swatting at the wasps an interesting exercise in dexterity. Just below the Inyo Mine complex the canyon splits into two forks. Our road took us up to the Inyo Mine, where there is a substantial group of photogenic ruins.
      The Inyo Mine, as well as most mining activity in this section of Death Valley, was an outgrowth of the fabulous southern Nevada mining phenomena initiated by Tonopah in 1900, Goldfield in 1902 and Rhyolite in 1904.  With activity further north at Keane Wonder, prospectors eventually made their way into Echo Canyon by early 1905.  In early March, two prolific prospecting partners, Chet Leavitt and Moroni Hicks, staked off 20 claims that became the Inyo Gold Mine.  By October, the Echo Mining District was formed, which later merged with the Lee district to the northeast (see also my video taken at Lee elsewhere on this site).  By December, the Inyo Gold Mining Company was formed.  In 1906, the towns associated with Lee on the other side of the range created so much energy that Echo Canyon also flourished, including the Inyo Mine.  A substantial camp formed below the mine, which included a boarding house, store, and other accommodations for its employees.  The financial panic of 1907 put a damper on the mining boom.  The Inyo sputtered off and on with development and production, but that was far better than other nearby towns and mines.  Though quiet and idle during much of the 1910s and first half of the 1920s, by the Depression years work began again with enough vigor to keep a small population at the camp until it was shut down for good in 1941.
      The two Alan’s and I explored and photographed the Inyo Mine complex.  Then we set up our camps.  Note, currently, camping is prohibited at the Inyo Mine.  At the time of our visit, we were ignorant of any regulations of camping at the site, if indeed there was any prohibition, and our written literature stated that camping was prohibited only along the first four miles of the road.
       
      Since we made the Inyo Mine at a relatively early hour with plenty of sunlight left in the afternoon, we explored the site. The temperature was far more moderate than down in the valley floor, my thermometer reading only 82° and a pleasant breeze coming up the canyon.  Alan Patera hiked up to the top of the canyon above the mine camp to investigate the main mine complex and structures up there. Alan Hensher, dressed only in shorts, T-shirt and sandals, stayed with me down at the mining camp. We found numerous buildings in various stages of decay and collapse, plus machinery.  It was our understanding that one of the larger structures still standing at the mine, one with a cupola on it, had just collapsed in the months previous to our visit.
      Alan and Alan teamed up to set up Alan’s tent (Alan Hensher’s), I set about setting up my camp in the back of my truck.  Our camp was along the road at the edge of the Inyo Mine camp.  Alan Patera set up his camp in his Explorer, parked a few dozen yards further up the road.  I prepared my meal on the tailgate while the two Alan’s talked history.  While doing so, I enjoyed a couple of cold cans of beer.
      Clouds built up in the west as the sun was setting, but then suddenly parted and the most wonderful glow of the last rays of sunlight created some of the most exciting coloring I’ve laid my eyes on. I was in the middle of eating my dinner when this light show suddenly descended upon us, I was compelled to grab my video and digital cameras to record it.
      As darkness descended upon our camp, a horrible swarm of gnats then later moths descended with the night. Liberal amounts of Cutters repellent helped, but the gnats were still irritating. We found that lighting my Coleman lantern and Alan Hensher’s florescent lantern and placing it away from us attracted the gnats to it and they left us alone to enjoy conversation about everything from our location to the history of lynching in California.
      At 9:30 PM, I took a sponge bath and crawled into the back of my truck to read before turning out the light at 10:45 PM and going to sleep at the Inyo Mine Camp, Echo Canyon, Funeral Range, Death Valley National Park.


       
       
  • Who's Online   0 Members, 0 Anonymous, 8 Guests (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online

×
×
  • Create New...