Jump to content
Explore Forums
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

Recommended Posts

I hope to start a "hot stove" topic...as much as I enjoyed reading about critters elsewhere in this blog, I'm dying of curiosity what people have to say and share about pets~!  The wife is a veterinary technician...so of course "critters are us".  Whereas we've been categorized as a "dinkwa"; double income, no kids, with animals...but in all honesty, for the cost of a bowl full of crunchies, another bowlful of water, it's humbling what we've enjoyed in return...including photos.

bigguy15.jpg

chessie18.jpg

crickett3.jpg

smokey39.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is Jacks, our Beagle.  He's old now - born January 5th, 2004 -and  I don't know how many years he has left with us.  He is such a large part of my life that it almost pains me to think about it.  No, I take that back.  It DOES pain me to think about it.  He responds to his name, as well as "JJ", and sometimes "shithead".  He has trained me well, loves my child, and I regret that my not-born-quite-yet daughter will likely never remember his kind face, gentle countenance, and unrelenting devotion.  He is, in all respects, my best friend - unwavering in loyalty, a determined companion who will stand in the rain with me, protect my family, and who has stolen my complete dinner more than once.  Also, he likes apples and acorns.

 

 

 

IMG_6357.jpg
 
Camera
iPhone 6 Plus
Focal Length
4.15mm
Aperture
f/2.2
Exposure
1/4s
ISO
400
IMG_6356.jpg
 
Camera
iPhone 6 Plus
Focal Length
4.15mm
Aperture
f/2.2
Exposure
1/15s
ISO
125

IMG_6507.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey! Two Opies here!

My wife and I loved our late Otis, also a Lhasa Apso. He died the second week of September, in my wife's arms, of cancer at nine years old. Opie was an impulse replacement by my wife to fill the void. He's now five months old. My wife is now finally bonding with him, but still cries almost daily for Otis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, David A. Wright said:

Hey! Two Opies here!

My wife and I loved our late Otis, also a Lhasa Apso. He died the second week of September, in my wife's arms, of cancer at nine years old. Opie was an impulse replacement by my wife to fill the void. He's now five months old. My wife is now finally bonding with him, but still cries almost daily for Otis.

My youngest bearded dragon died of skin cancer this spring.  here's her grave(it's the huge carn bottom center of the pic.  

Zoology,History,FamilyandSuchMay6,2016-Nov24,2016_811.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, David A. Wright said:

Hey! Two Opies here!

My wife and I loved our late Otis, also a Lhasa Apso. He died the second week of September, in my wife's arms, of cancer at nine years old. Opie was an impulse replacement by my wife to fill the void. He's now five months old. My wife is now finally bonding with him, but still cries almost daily for Otis.

 

 Hey, about 6/7 yrs ago I had a dog killed by a Mohave rattlesnake and got Opie as a fill in too. I went to look at a yellow lab pup, (Opie's brother) and Opie stuck to my left leg like velcro.  This dog let me know when I was having my heart attack a few yrs back and between him and my nagging wife, I was convinced to go to ER and get checked out. Good thing I did. This dog helps unload the truck when I go get firewood, takes out the trash with me, and brings me my slippers at night, and brings me my hat.  Smartest dang dog I've ever had. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, dery said:

My female cherry head "VV".  

Zoology,History,FamilyandSuchMay6,2016-Nov24,2016_1685.JPG

Box turtle?  My wife came with a box turtle named 'Mac'.  She decided to give him away just before Emily was born, so now he lives with my boss and his two girls.  Pretty cool critter. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, desertdog said:

Box turtle?  My wife came with a box turtle named 'Mac'.  She decided to give him away just before Emily was born, so now he lives with my boss and his two girls.  Pretty cool critter. 

No, Cherry heads are a Caribbean/South American tortoise also known as the red footed tortoise.  Box turtles are harder to keep since they need more space to be healthy.  VV is very smart and loves her head scratched.  She goes running up to anyone she sees with bananas.  She'll eat them out of my hand.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a trip.  Mac was basically a rock.  He had plenty of space, and we'd put him outside (with us watching him) to let him really get around.  He'd just sit there, or run and hide.  Food-wise, we'd give him all sorts of fresh produce and protein.  All he would eat is turtle pellets from the store. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What a talented dog.  I've never had one that can surf, sup or skateboard with me.  My sister has an unknown mix who serves as the family curr dog when it comes to herping.  Although, he is curious, so I keep distance between him and our finds when I herp with him.  He's a real help flipping the right cover.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love it when folks take their herding dogs to the beach on a nice day.  If the dog is off the leash, they inevitably start rounding up small children.  You go from 5000 square feet occupied by a group of little ones, to 50 square feet crowded with the same. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, desertdog said:

I love it when folks take their herding dogs to the beach on a nice day.  If the dog is off the leash, they inevitably start rounding up small children.  You go from 5000 square feet occupied by a group of little ones, to 50 square feet crowded with the same. 

My family tends to only take our pets, especially stock dogs to beaches when they are not crowded and outside wildlife nesting seasons.  I really like Gulf Islands National Seashore.  It has pristine sand dunes and is never much people.  . 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can get in trouble with this category, lol. I wish I can take my dogs exploring with us, but only have a sedan. Can't when it's me, hubby and the 2 kids. :-(

Mika - 105 lb Akbash - white dog

Fritz - 95 lb German Shepherd - rescued from shelter

Zeus (orange cat) - cat my husband rescued from work when he was 4 weeks old

Warlock (black long haired cat) - craigslist rescue

Junior (white tabby)- from a cat rescue I fostered for. Pic is of him knocking things off the entertainment center to amuse himself

My son has a Wood Ornate turtle and my daughter just got a lop eared bunny for her birthday (it's ok, because I get free fertilizer for the garden now, lol.

 

 

13886322_10208403662962556_1805458391386311790_n.jpg

15095517_10209279512018235_3540308407994855498_n.jpg

1625753_10202631043690682_3245861053204679019_n.jpg

10246571_10202631057891037_2235063339054960103_n.jpg

12065644_10206391818507702_9221321478433038434_n.jpg

13076857_10207633528429674_8810829841516282739_n.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My cat, simply named Mr. Kitty. Why? When we moved into our house 7 years ago he came with it. The previous tenants had abandoned him. It took weeks for me to lure him out of the shrubs in the backyard where he was living. Other neighbors told us that the previous tenant and his mother had abused his children and their pets. We found locks on the OUTSIDE of bedroom doors.

Anyway, Mr. Kitty was so "people shy" that even though we were finally able to lure him into the house we could never get close enough to see if Mr. Kitty was a he or a she. We automatically assumed he was a "she." So, we just named "her" Kitty. Eventually, after about two years there was enough trust where we could get close enough to see that Kitty was actually Mr. Kitty! For the record, he HATES the dog, LOL!

_DSC9707.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, CindyN11 said:

My cat, simply named Mr. Kitty. Why? When we moved into our house 7 years ago he came with it. The previous tenants had abandoned him. It took weeks for me to lure him out of the shrubs in the backyard where he was living. Other neighbors told us that the previous tenant and his mother had abused his children and their pets. We found locks on the OUTSIDE of bedroom doors.

Anyway, Mr. Kitty was so "people shy" that even though we were finally able to lure him into the house we could never get close enough to see if Mr. Kitty was a he or a she. We automatically assumed he was a "she." So, we just named "her" Kitty. Eventually, after about two years there was enough trust where we could get close enough to see that Kitty was actually Mr. Kitty! For the record, he HATES the dog, LOL!

_DSC9707.JPG

 

Aw, thank you for showing him what good humans can do. It's horrible what they did to their children and pets :-(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sadie and Butter. I feature them in my webcomic as "military working dog" characters, but --Ha!-- that would imply they had some sort of "discipline". I tend to spoil my pups.

I don't take them with me; they are getting up there in years and would not have the requisite stamina.

 

Sadie and Butter.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Talking about military behavior, The one on the left looks like a medic and the one on the right looks like an officer if ye ask me.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Who's Online   3 Members, 0 Anonymous, 8 Guests (See full list)

  • Our picks

    • This is the location of the famous Mojave Phone Booth. Unfortunately not much is left today, but it's still a cool location to visit with an interesting history. 
      • 1 reply
    • South Pass City WY
      South Pass City, approximately 90 miles north of Rock Springs, is a historic site administered by the state of Wyoming.  It consists of over 30 log, frame, and stone buildings, along with the Carissa Mine and Stamp Mill.



      South Pass City Historic Site
      • 11 images
    • Surprise Canyon, California
      Recently, I’ve been going through my old VHS video tapes and digitizing them to DVDs.  These tapes contain my travels and explorations between 1995 and 2009.  I thought I’d start releasing some video shorts of my early travels on this forum.

      The back story for this particular video is as follows.  On March 30, 1996, I made a short hike of about a mile and a third up the lower third of Surprise Canyon, on the western slopes of the Panamint Range, Inyo County, California.  This canyon is just outside of Death Valley National Park.  This canyon has running water running year round through the stretch shown, fed by substantial Limekiln Springs, and the canyon is a water wonderland.  For those not familiar with the area, refer to the two maps.  The first one shows the canyon in relation to the region, the other a close up of the canyon and the ghost town of Panamint City.  The blue line in the close up image shows the route that was taken.

      • 23 replies
    • Exploration Field Trips - March 31-April 2, 2000 - Into the Nevada Triangle with Lew Shorb
      My next series of videos will be based on a trip in 2000 that I took with Lew Shorb.  Lew is a board member here, as well as owner of the popular website http://www.ghosttownexplorers.org/ghost.htm

      In breaking with my past habit of culling out historical sites and ghost towns and creating short videos dealing with these, I decided to keep the exploring part of Explore Forums in and create videos of each day of my travel and exploration, including our camps.  Scenery, travel, camping ghost towns and wide open spaces.

      Part one of this series, as well as subsequent videos, will all appear here within this same thread. Part I will start in my garage, where I was finishing up with the packing my truck.  The following day, after work, I begin my travels to meet Lew Shorb at Rhyolite, Nevada ghost town.

      Our three day, two night travels prowled about the "Nevada Triangle" section of northeastern Death Valley National Park; and will include such sites as:

      1. The Las Vegas & Tonopah Railroad
      2. Gold Bar
      3. Phinney Mine
      4. Strozzi Ranch
      5. Currie Well (LV&T RR)
      6. Mud Springs Summit (LV&T RR)
      7. Happy Hooligan Mine


      This video, that of March 30th and 31st, will start off this series; and is brief, only being 3:28 long.  Nevada-Triangle_Shorb-2000_Part-1.wmv

      So, below is my narrative of part one of this series to give full context of what is seen in the video.  It will probably take longer to read than the video is long.

      --------------------------


       
      • 9 replies
    • Exploration Field Trips: May 1-3, 2000 - Trip with Alan Patera and Alan Hensher into Death Valley
      Exploration Field Trips:
      May 1-3, 2000
      Trip with Alan Patera and Alan Hensher into Death Valley

      What do you do with three authors, two 4x4’s, two two-way radios, three cameras, and camping supplies? Send them to Death Valley, of course. For three days in the first week of May, 2000, fellow authors and historical researchers Alan Patera, Alan Hensher and myself explored Death Valley north and south.

      Alan Patera writes and publishes the WESTERN PLACES series of monograph books.  Alan Hensher has been published in several periodicals as well as authoring several books, centering primarily on the history of Mojave Desert sites.

      Alan Patera, who hails from Oregon, came south to California and picked up Alan Hensher; then the two came my way. At the time I was living in Ridgecrest, California. After overnighting with my wife and I, the three of us took off for Death Valley.  Alan was busy researching and photographing for a future edition of WESTERN PLACES, this time centering on the camps of the Funeral Range, which forms the eastern border of east central Death Valley.  Circumstances and changes of our journey lead Alan to plant the seeds of two more future books, this time centering just outside the northernmost section of Death Valley.




       

       
      • 4 replies
×
×
  • Create New...