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David A. Wright

Ambient Lighting

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So as not to clutter up Harley Kuehl's thread, I thought I'd start a thread with ambient lighting photos.  Feel free to post any photos taken without flash.

Now onto some of mine.  In no particular order.

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Sunset from the backyard of my former home at Big Pine, California.  Though the sun had already set from our point of view, the sun dropped below the clouds behind the Sierra Nevada Range, creating this dramatic sunset.  This photo was only lightly enhanced due to the propensity of early digital cameras to create dull photos.

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Taken near my present home in Winnemucca, Nevada.  Subzero temperatures created what is locally known as pogonip, or ice fog.

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View of Winnemucca, Nevada from the near the summit of Winnemucca Mountain.  Winnemucca sits at an elevation of 4,299 feet, the point this photo was taken is 6,638 feet.

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Moonrise over the White Mountain Range from Owens Valley, the ranch located north of Big Pine, California.

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Colorful clouds, taken in my back yard at my former home of Big Pine, California.

2012-10-23_grass-valley-ranch.jpg

A late afternoon image taken just north of my home near Winnemucca.  The Sonoma Range is in the background.

2012-12-28_phone_foggy-walmart.jpg

A socked in, subzero morning in Winnemucca.  The scene is the Walmart complex.  The temperatures was around –20°, if I remember correctly.  I took this image with my old phone, which had an image resolution of 1.5 megabytes and wasn’t noted for noteworthy images.

2013-01-29_phone_shone-house_2013-01-29.jpg

The old Shone House, a historic former late 1800’s hotel in Winnemucca.  Image taken mid-morning.

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I've got to confess to a learning curve, what's the secret to staggering your photos with text?...if you notice my previous posts...I've resorted to text, with all the photos at the bottom...is that the difference between dragging the files and choosing the files?  Thanks in advance for the help!

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Well, for the sake of sharing...and still haven't figured out all the bugs (!) here, the first shot is White River Junction VT, 2nd shot is Fish Lake WA, and the 3rd shot is north of Pasco WA...and hopefully they show up in that order!

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On December 24, 2016 at 11:56 AM, Harley Kuehl said:

I've got to confess to a learning curve, what's the secret to staggering your photos with text?...if you notice my previous posts...I've resorted to text, with all the photos at the bottom...is that the difference between dragging the files and choosing the files?  Thanks in advance for the help!

Well, it looks as though you figured it out. :beer:

In my case, I can't sit at my computer and type some text, insert a photo, etcetera. I don't have internet at home. Because where I live there are no fiber optic lines, there is no internet other than satellite or spotty cell phone. So I write my text on my computer with written prompts to insert a specific photo at a specific point. Then I put my photos and a text file on a thumb drive and drive into town to the library and upload and manually insert the photos on their computers.

Otherwise, such as now in that I have no photos to share today, I use my iPad tablet at the library using their WiFi (our county library is so behind the times, they didn't have WiFi until last year). I could theoretically use my tablet in the same way that I use the library's computers to do this sort of thing, but my iPad won't interface with my 10-year old laptop and iPads don't accept external storage so that I could access the tens of thousands of photos from the last 35 years that I have stored on countless CDs, DVDs and on an external hard drive.

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Wow...would have never guessed!  But I DO love your style of presentation!  You can break down details between the different shots...and this is what we were striving for/talking about in other threads...details that people won't necessarily ask about, but if you list, they bloody well remember given the opportunity to nail the same shot.  Computer 5; Harley 1...just kidding....

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Some miscellaneous images.

100_0623.jpg

Driving at night through Lone Pine, California.  Open shutter for a couple seconds (the maximum my old digital camera would do so).

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East of Big Pine, California, in the Inyo Range.  This road ran between the Owens Valley and Death Valley.

RoundMountain_Nevada_1984.jpg

Original Round Mountain, Nevada in 1984.  Now the town is completely surrounded by an immense mountain of tailings from the adjacent Round Mountain open pit mine.  All businesses are closed, last I hear only a hold out or two still live there.  The rest have moved down in the valley below.

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I took this self portrait in my bathroom mirror in 1980.  No flash, just ambient lack of light.

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In Panamint Valley, the valley west of Death Valley, the military likes to play with their toys.  They always make a good show.  Sometimes you get the crap scared out of you when they buzz your car from behind at 500 mph less than 50 feet over your head ...

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Round Mountain sounds like it would be a great place to visit before it's all destroyed and looted. 

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The last time I was in Round Mountain was 2002 or 2003. I have photos, so will post some for comparison.

I used to have friends who lived there in the 1970s and early 1980s, occasionally staying with them. Their home was one of the earliest homes in town. But I have no photos of it.

I used that image to give an example of "documentary" style photography, in which I take the photo because it's there, not waiting for the perfect lighting. I mentioned that in my reply to Harley early in this thread.

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On 12/28/2016 at 4:07 PM, David A. Wright said:

I guess that comes from years of being a published author.

I'm not surprised...but you're not alone in that circle here either!  It's a bugger though when the comparisons don't pan out...got some shots here of Milwaukee Road climbing out of Avery Idaho making it's way for Montana....sadly now all you can shoot is a bare right of way...

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RoundMountain_Nevada_1984.jpg

012_roundmountain.jpg

Round Mountain, Nevada, was mentioned earlier and I promised a later photo.  The above photo was taken on my last trip into the Round Mountain townsite, in 2003.  Though I've been by on the highway below the townsite numerous times since, I've never had the heart to take the three mile detour and stop in for a looksee.  This image I chose out of the dozen images I had taken, because it is the closest to imitate my 1984 image.  The tailings from the open pit next to town are evident, though other images I took show how extensive they are.  At the time, a few holdouts still clung to their properties, and if they haven't died or gave up by now, I suppose the time will come - if it hasn't yet - for Round Mountain to disappear into the open pit mine next door.  But presently, I don't have a clue as to Round Mountain's current status.

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