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Harley Kuehl

Busted...and not by the law!

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So I'm just reaching out for some feedback...the last time I traveled two years ago I did the move of treating my tripod as checked luggage.  I've got a Bogen tripod bag...it's a soft bag as opposed to a hard surfaced/Samsonite type...well needless to say, the poor tripod ended up busted getting to the destination.  And the airlines were more than happy to rinse their hands clean of any responsibility.  Seems odd that we're PAYING for our bags in our travels (except for Southwest) and yet they can get away with this?  More and more I find reason to believe and hope in Star Trek "Scotty, beam me there!"  As I'm aiming to get back on the road this year and do some extensive travels after numerous surgeries, this is one situation I'm itching to bounce around and do a reality check!  Thanks for any input in advance!

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I don't ever put anything valuable in checked luggage.  Ever since they began banning nearly everything and effectively banning locks on luggage (except firearms) used to check my customary leatherman multi-tool.. twice I tried and twice it was stolen.  I now bring a cheap kershaw folder in my checked luggage so I have something pointy at the other end and not a big loss if it's stolen.  I also carry 12' titanium knitting needles in carry on, and bring the TSA rules that specifically allow them...  AARP to the rescue on that I think ;-)

Only time I fly anymore is emergencies and work..  I will drive across the country rather than fly, done it many times and find the trip much more worthwhile..although time consuming of course.

Oh yeah, trick I see a lot of people using (often the majority) is to have a roller carryon that's max size allowed.  Very often they'll check it at the gate for free, it ends up on the top of the pile and you pick it up at the gate.  Main downside is it takes time, if you've got a connective flight might cause issues.. however there is much less change of damage or theft in that case. 

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Here is my TSA story.  I live in Ohio and was working in Florida. I came home one Friday night for the weekend and left again Sunday afternoon. All I had with me was my backpack with computer in it. So put it in a plastic tub and put change, phone, belt  etc. in another.  Tubs went thru the x-ray machine and I went in body scanner.  Before I could retrieve my stuff TSA pulled me aside for a body grope.  I went and got my stuff and went to the gate. Hmm did I have my watch this weekend?  I don't remember.  I called my son to go by the house and see if I had left it there.  I went back to the gate to see if anyone had turned it in.  Nothing at the gate.  Son called back not at the house. Check house when I got to Florida, nothing there either. I called the TSA at the airport and told them what had happened, they would check and call back.  Got a call from them the next day, no one had seen my watch. So I called the Airport Police and reported it stolen by the TSA.  My watch is very easy to ID it has my name, rank, years of service and unit engraved on the back.  It was my retirement watch.  I was contacted the next day and they had my watch. They said someone had turned it in.  Called my son and he went to the Airport Police office at the airport and picked it up for me.  Yep I hate to fly too!

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Only reason you got it back is it was easy to identify.  Airport security has become more of a joke that ever, theater for the masses...staffed by fast food rejects for the most part.  Last time I flew the guy they had checking ID's in Akron/Canton airport (I work for a company in Ohio) was...well to put it un-politically-correct...retarded. He had some obvious mental difficulties, and this guy was supposed to verify ID's????

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I agree with Brenden, everywhere are druggy thieves. Baggage people dont give a rats butt about luggage one way or another. Unfortunately, carry only what you can afford to loose. Cant have a damn thing nice anymore, if it aint stolen, its destroyed

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On 2/1/2017 at 2:32 PM, braindead0 said:

I will drive across the country rather than fly, done it many times and find the trip much more worthwhile..although time consuming of course.

Brenden, I've done driven across the country twice as well....hugging the northern route from Vermont to Washington State.  I have to confess, I was chasing after a job so I was going thru the hassle of driving 14 hours a day to get to my destination.  Saw some great countryside...but damn! There's a LOT of boring miles in between!!!  Get to be echoing the kids rant from the television commercial..."Are we there yet?... Are we there yet?"  LOL  I'm old enough to remember flying LONG before 9/11....when it was FUN...now it's just a damn cattle call....and an expensive one at that!

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I quit flying after 1998, after several years flying between Las Vegas and New York and Dallas on the job. No TSA back then.

My wife quit flying after 9/11, when the United flight from Boston to Los Angeles just before hers was highjacked and slammed into the World Trade Center.

Now we enjoy Amtrack or just driving.

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I agree David, I enjoy driving much more as I like to stop and see everything I possibly can while traveling. I haven't taken a flight in a very long time. 

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Last flight for me was 2003, too many stories of stuff getting stolen by the TSA. I'd rather drive and make it a real adventure lol. Kinda hard to do to get over to England again though.

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Driving from Reno to Ohio would take up too much vacation time that I have better things to do with,  lucky for me the new management has little interest in dragging me back there without reason.  Previous directer felt it was important that I get 'face time' with people in the office, new management realizes it's not really necessary... I attend meetings remotely, works fine... 

One thing I've started doing that appears to limit theft, zip tie all the zippers.  It keeps the random lookers out, only time I've ever had them cut was once (in last 5 or 6 trips) and that was a case where they inspected the luggage and left the official 'TSA inspected your bag.yadda yadda' things.   The few times I've had things stolen were not official inspections.

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Me and my family took a trip from DC to LA about 7 years ago, and we mostly drove on route 66 on the way there, and on rural routes through Idaho, Wyoming, and South Dakota on the way back. The whole trip took about 3 weeks but it was so cool.

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3 hours ago, Robby said:

Me and my family took a trip from DC to LA about 7 years ago, and we mostly drove on route 66 on the way there, and on rural routes through Idaho, Wyoming, and South Dakota on the way back. The whole trip took about 3 weeks but it was so cool.

That's exactly how I like to travel! 

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