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11 hours ago, Arch Stanton said:

Couldn't agree more. Your feet are a one set per user deal, and a bad pair of boots can leave you miserable. I already have the bionic spine pieces at L4-5 and L5-S1 and would like to keep everything else stock, as it were. For many years I wore them 5 days a week 10 hours a day, under all conditions. It was rare for me, but I listened to the Old Farts, and bought the best I could afford, Danners. I did stray once or twice, but always came back to them.

'buying the best you can afford' is confusing correlation with causation and I think it plays into marketing and manipulation.  Price can be an indicator of quality, however it's not a given.   Jimmy Choo boots will set you back over a grand, are they better than Danner??? probably not for hiking.

A lot of companies start out making the best, then they start cutting corners to improve profits.  Until the buyers catch on and they collapse.  Often this happens after they are bought out by another company, I think it's SOP for much of the U.S. auto industry, and I recall the cowboy boot industry going through something along these lines (I remember Tony Lama's used to be really expensive).  Market cycles can play havoc on quality..

Thus this thread, get feedback on the current state of quality in boots.

 

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Brenden I think we are talking circles around each other. "The best you can afford" isn't confusing at all, to me. I am too old, too cheap and have been burned too many times to pay much attention to marketing.  "The best you can afford" is simply an acknowledgement that in many cases buying a higher quality product will require spending a bit more money, but it doesn't relieve the buyer of the responsibility for doing their due diligence before dropping the $ on the counter.

A discussion like this is simply  part of doing that due diligence. There certainly is value to a thread like this, and a discussion about the state of the art of boots, and the contributions from folks are a good thing.

 

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1 hour ago, Arch Stanton said:

Brenden I think we are talking circles around each other. "The best you can afford" isn't confusing at all, to me. I am too old, too cheap and have been burned too many times to pay much attention to marketing.  "The best you can afford" is simply an acknowledgement that in many cases buying a higher quality product will require spending a bit more money, but it doesn't relieve the buyer of the responsibility for doing their due diligence before dropping the $ on the counter.

A discussion like this is simply  part of doing that due diligence. There certainly is value to a thread like this, and a discussion about the state of the art of boots, and the contributions from folks are a good thing.

 

I know, it's a pretty common phrase....  I just like decomposing phrases like that... which led to ponder... wonder if that phrase was originally from some advertising?  It kinda sounds like it, and often these things enter into the mainstream and stick ;-)

And agreed, this thread has been a good discussion of boots in general.. some interesting concepts (first I read of rebuildable was on the Danner website ;-) and have that explained in a bit more detail is very helpful.

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Never had the chance to wear Danner's...never mind who had them available...and I've been kicking around in boots since I hired out on the Milwaukee in '75!  But...it is shameful that my ole standby Red Wings are NOT what they used to be...and I was always faithful about layers of Huberd's shoe grease out of Oregon...which is one place you are always in water!!!  Sure seems as if the rough terrain of rring never did show me a promising boot...at least something that would last a good couple strong years...in my later years, i would make it a habit of buying something around September, giving me a couple warm months to get the grease to soak in, and the boots broke in before the winter snows hit in late October or November.

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23 minutes ago, Harley Kuehl said:

Never had the chance to wear Danner's...never mind who had them available...and I've been kicking around in boots since I hired out on the Milwaukee in '75!  But...it is shameful that my ole standby Red Wings are NOT what they used to be...and I was always faithful about layers of Huberd's shoe grease out of Oregon...which is one place you are always in water!!!  Sure seems as if the rough terrain of rring never did show me a promising boot...at least something that would last a good couple strong years...in my later years, i would make it a habit of buying something around September, giving me a couple warm months to get the grease to soak in, and the boots broke in before the winter snows hit in late October or November.

I think Red Wing found that opening up a bunch of one-brand shoe stores would be costly to manage/maintain.  Something had to give, and perhaps quality was sacrificed.  It was nice to see a couple of styles of Danner boots at Big R.. wasn't a big selection and nothing in a taller boot though.

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Harley I hear you on the loss of the Red Wing Quality. My Dad was a machinist in the Port Of Long Beach for 30 years, and was on his feet on concrete all day every day, and swore by them. I think the quality started going south in the late 80's.

Brenden I remember my folks using the that phrase, and even my Grandparents. My Mom is 86, and a child of the depression. Dad was born in 1927. In my family the meaning has always been simple and direct, Many people today have shifted their priority away from it, and look for the cheapest stuff they can find, with little or no emphasis in quality. I''m 58 and can remember when people really did take the "buying the best you can afford" phrase seriously.

What started with people trying to stretch a dime in to a dollar has morphed into something else entirely.

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