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nvexpeditions

Florida's "Citrus Center" Monument on the Old Tampa Highway

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Standing nearly-forgotten between Kissimmee and Davenport is a large concrete monument that once welcomed visitors to Polk County, Florida's "Citrus Center" (though the marker is actually nearly a quarter mile from the county line in Osceola County). Around 1930, several of these markers were erected at entry points to the county, and today only three remain.

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This one stands in its original home, along what was once the Tampa Highway/Dixie Highway/Lee Jackson Highway. Interestingly, on one side of the monument, Citrus is actually misspelled 'Citurs.' Apparently, there was a vote early this year to move the monument to a more prominent location, which was voted down. The highway has since been re-routed to the east (US-92), but 'Old Kissimmee Road' or 'Old Tampa Highway' still remains, and even has original brick paving in places. Definitely a cool find.

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When I was a kid, my parents and I made generally annual trips to northern Oklahoma to visit my paternal grandparents, aunts and uncles and cousins. Being that I was born and raised in the south central Mojave Desert, the route took us along US66. Ponca City, near the Kansas border north of Oklahoma City, was where my father was born and raised and where some of his family still lived. Back then (1950s-1960s) the town’s main streets were all brick. I clearly remember them. Today, they’re all torn up. I know they made for a rough ride, but the nostalgia is long gone.

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Any word if this is still there? I'm heading to the area later this month and am hoping to track down some of these "forgotten" citrus monuments, but I'm having trouble finding this one on Google Maps. 

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8 hours ago, rck said:

Any word if this is still there? I'm heading to the area later this month and am hoping to track down some of these "forgotten" citrus monuments, but I'm having trouble finding this one on Google Maps. 

As of the 12/17/2018 aerial view on Google Earth, it's still there. From Kissimmee, if you're heading SW on Orange Blossom Trail (US-17), turn right on Labor Camp Rd; not far past Osceola-Polk Line at the electrical substation. Labor Camp ends at Old Tampa Highway, turn right. It should be on the left, hard to miss. There was some degree of construction the last time I was there, but I don't think it should have affected the monument.

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