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  1. ElPolvo

    ElPolvo

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    • By Backwoods Beast
      We got a tour of the Goldfield hotel. Hope you like the video. Please like and subscribe.
       
       
    • By astro
      I rather not say my name, the person who owns this place, who knows.. Maybe government? No signage says its government. But after going there the sheriff met me at my car and told me I can't go back. I look at the search on the parcels and it says state trust land. My guess its an abandoned missile bunker or even base! Who knows. I went there to explore the place and I couldn't find anything. I'm wondering if anyone has any idea what this is. This is really bothering me.
       

    • By Bob
      I found some interesting statistics regarding abandoned mine accidents and deaths.
      Here are some stats to consider:
      Total deaths from mine accidents from 2001 to 2013: 251
      Sounds like a lot, kind of (probably more dangerous to drive to the mines), but then when you start to dig you find out that:
      167 of those deaths occurred from drowning while swimming in a quarry.
      33 were caused by ATV accidents.
      That's 200 deaths that I don't think should qualify as abandoned mine accidents, or at least not what I would consider hazards of exploring old mines.
      The rest, 51 deaths, in 12 years in the ENTIRE UNITED STATES seems like a very small amount of deaths from exploring old mines, yet the BLM is paying something like $40,000 to a contractor to make a mine "safe". From what I have been told, there is no set definition of what is considered "safe", and the contractors get paid the same no matter how close or far from the road the mines are. This means these contractors are closing off safe entrances to tunnels while leaving 200 foot shafts opened 20 yards away. This is exactly what I have been seeing too. What a disgusting waste of our tax dollars!
      So what can stop this madness? Would it require a lawsuit?
      Source
    • By CindyN11
      I decided to do this article a little bit differently by writing it from the point-of-view of a young woman who lived in Silver City, Idaho. This mining war was a little known incident in the history of Silver City.
       
       
      "I am Rebecca Dye Hays, but most folk just call me Reba. I have lived in Silver City, Idaho since about 1864, when my papa moved the family here from California, so I’m acquainted with most of the folk involved in all the hoohaw that went on around here for a bit. This town has never been the most quiet or peaceful of places, and we have our fair share of violent deaths, but the year 1868, starting in February of that year, was a time of great stress and anxiety for this town. The troubles all began when Beachy and Grayson’s men were working the Golden Chariot mine, and broke through a vein of ore that crossed with the Ida Elmore vein, which was owned by Marion More and Mr. Fogus. This breach caused all kinds of ruckus and ructions between the two outfits, and men who were once friendly towards each other turned into quarreling, hateful brutes, but that’s always the way of things between men when it involves money, land or women, isn’t it? Folks in town were so riled up and on edge that you could cut the tension with a knife, and word was going around that up there on War Eagle Hill men were turning the area into armed camps with barricades and some hard eyed men had been hired to act as military troops ready to cut down the enemy. Anyway, I wasn’t paying too much attention to the dispute, as you could rightly say that I had my head in the clouds. With my upcoming marriage in early March 1868 to Charley Hays, I could think of little else. My Charley is employed at the Idaho Hotel as a stage agent ya know. Well, March 25th comes around and next thing ya know open warfare has broken out between the two sides with men a shooting away at each other 300 feet underground, nearly causing the Ida to collapse! Why, I heard tell that they were even lobbing grenades and Greek Fire at each other, for goodness sake! This went on for days and a number of good men died. You can imagine the relief we all felt when both sides finally came to their senses and on the 1st of April came to an agreement that put an end to the conflict, or at least we all thought.  I have to confide that most of us in the town thought Mr. More had gotten the short end of the stick and the general feeling was that he did it for peace and the good of the town. That was just the kind of man he was. I know there had been whispers here and there through the years regarding some great mystery about his past in California, but that does not matter much here. He was well liked and respected in Silver City because he treated everyone with kindness, especially the more common folk. Well, the evening of April 1st some of the men from the Ida Elmore enjoyed a celebration of sorts at the Idaho Hotel. Mr. More and a few of his friends, including Jack Fisher and Ben White, came outside, a bit the worse for having too much of the drink in them mind ya, and they ran into Sam Lockhart, a Golden Chariot man. At the time I was standing across the road near the Morning Star livery chatting with my friend Mary Ann Finn, who was marrying her beau Erasmus in a few short weeks, and I had just shared a special secret with her. Although married only a few short weeks myself I suspected I was already in the family way and we were both giggling like school girls over my Charley’s reaction. The poor dolt at first thought I was playing him for an April Fool’s, and it took some doing before he was convinced that I wasn’t just pulling his leg. Next thing you know our chat was interrupted and the peace of the night was shattered by the sounds of gunshots ringing out in the night air, men shouting and yelling and poor Marion More was running down the street with blood seeping out of his chest and from between his fingers. He collapsed not too far away in front of the Oriental Restaurant just down the road a piece there. Some folk reckon that ol Marion was feelin a bit burned by the whole deal with Beachy and Grayson, so when he came across Lockhart hanging about out side the hotel it kind of fired up his temper. He had a few harsh words with him and then slapped Sam square in the face, or threatened to strike Sam with his cane, depending on which story you hear. Sam raised his gun and fired at Marion. In retaliation Jack and Ben fired back and Jack hit Sam Lockhart in the arm. To tell you honest I didn’t see the eruption with my own two eyes, but I sure as heck heard it! The good folk in this town were mad as hornets and this was the final straw. Mr. More had a lot of friends in this town and it seems that before you could blink an eye all of them were at the hotel, pounding on the door and demanding vengeance. Had it not been for cooler heads prevailing there would have been a lynching that night of more than one Golden Chariot man! Anyway, Marion, whose real name was John Neptune Marion Moore, was taken away by his brother Masons and buried in Idaho City. Jack Fisher was charged with murder, but left the territory and was never heard from again. Sam Lockhart had to have his arm amputated, which caused an infection and eventually killed him a few weeks later. As for me, well, I was indeed in the family way, and that December I gave birth to my little daughter and buried her that same month. Yes indeed, 1868 was a bad year for sure."
       
      For those who wish to read more, here is what is believed to be the ONLY existing written witness account...
       
      http://idahohistory.cdmhost.com/cdm/ref/collection/p265501coll1/id/269
       
      @ 2013 Cindy Nunn. All Rights Reserved.
    • By CindyN11
      http://azstarnet.com/news/local/ruby-was-prosperous-town-attractive-mark-for-outlaws/article_0d646292-03e1-5c7e-9215-36e35a3c35b6.html
       
      July 22, 2013 12:00 am Loading… Ruby mining site endures as well-known ghost town Editor's note: This is the second in a two-part series on the mining town of Ruby. Click here to read the first part. Read more
      Editor's note: This is the first in a two-part series on the mining town of Ruby.
      The Oro Blanco mining district 30 miles northwest of Nogales was first prospected by the Spanish for gold deposits.
      A highly sought-after quartz vein known as the Montana vein was discovered by Americans there in the 1870s.
      Placer mining, a method of extracting gold from sand and gravel accumulations in washes and streams, was one of the earliest forms of mining in the area. The Montana Mine became the prominent mine in the area, first operated by the Orion Mining Co. with the erection of the Ostrich mill. More mills were built at the nearby Austerlitz, Golden Eagle, Old Glory, Oro and Yellow Jacket mines.
      By the early 1900s, amalgamation and cyanide mills were built on the Montana property to recover the gold and silver mined in the district. The area was known as Montana Camp until the application for a post office by Julius Andrews, a prominent merchant in the camp.
      Named after Julius' wife, Lillie B. Ruby Andrews, the town of Ruby was established in 1912 and reached a peak population of 1,200 during the 1930s. Three- hundred men were employed at the mine and the mill.
      From 1916 to 1918, the Goldfield Consolidated Mines Exploration Co. operated the Montana Mine, extracting $265,000 in gold, silver and lead. These were prosperous times.
      Ruby was not without its perils, especially given its proximity (four miles) to the Mexican border and concerns among ranchers and miners regarding cross-border raids by Mexican revolutionaries.
      Ruby's general store was the scene of several grisly murders. One occurred in 1920, when the two brothers, Alex and John Fraser, who operated the store, were killed during an armed robbery conducted by two Mexican laborers from the nearby Twin Buttes Mine.
      One of the robbers was killed in a shootout. and the other escaped to Mexico.
      Eighteen months later, Frank Pearson and his wife, Myrtle, who took over the store, were the victims of another robbery. They met the same fate as the former managers. Two of the seven bandits involved in the second robbery were captured - Manuel Martinez and Placido Silvas were convicted of the crime - and the former was executed.
      The Eagle-Picher Mining and Smelting Co. assumed control of the Montana Mine property in 1926. That year the company hired Walter S. Pfrimmer, a graduate of the Colorado School of Mines in Golden, Colo. Much of his time was taken up surveying the surrounding land for ore deposits.
      In 1928, Pfrimmer was asked to design a route for a pipeline from a well near the Santa Cruz River to Ruby (covering 17 miles over the Atascosa Mountains) to bring water to the mine and town. The pipeline went through Peck Canyon, Hells Gate Canyon and Corral Nuevo and into Ruby.
      Trestles were built in the canyons to stabilize the pipe. Construction on the iron pipeline was completed in early 1930 at a cost of $100,000.
      Amado, a station on the Southern Pacific Railway 36 miles northeast of Ruby, served as the supply point for the pipe brought by rail from the Texas oil fields. The pipe was trucked or hauled by pack mule to the work site.
      Share your photos
      "Mining Tales" writer William Ascarza is working on a book about the history of mining in Arizona, and he's looking for historical and modern-day photographs depicting mining operations, towns and camps to include in the book. If you'd like your photos included, email him at willascarza@gmail.com
      William Ascarza is an archivist, historian and author of five books, including "Southeastern Arizona Mining Towns," available at Antigone Books, Cat Mountain Emporium and the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum. Email him at mining@azstarnet.com Sources: Personal interview with Tallia Cahoon, daughter of a Ruby mining engineer, conducted July 13, 2013; Bulletin No. 158 "Arizona Zinc and Lead Deposits"; "Ghosts of the Adobe Walls" by Nell Murbarger; "From Southern Arizona's Oro Blanco Region, Ruby, Arizona: Mining, Mayhem and Murder," by Bob Ring, Al Ring and Tallia Pfrimmer Cahoon; "Arizona Ghost Towns and Mining Camps" by Philip Varney.
       
      July 29, 2013 12:00 am
      Loading… Ruby was prosperous town, attractive mark for outlaws Editor's note: This is the first in a two-part series on the mining town of Ruby. Read more
      Editor's note: This is the second in a two-part series on the mining town of Ruby. Click here to read the first part.
      Walter S. Pfrimmer married Natalia Allison on April 18, 1928. The Pfrimmers raised their family, including their eldest daughter, Tallia - born in 1929 - and her sister and brother in the mining town of Ruby in Santa Cruz County.
      Pfrimmer, a graduate of the Colorado School of Mines in Golden, Colo., worked for the Eagle-Picher Mining and Smelting Co. and spent much time surveying the surrounding land for ore deposits.
      Some of Tallia's fondest childhood memories of Ruby are of her association with the children of local miners and the "good life" that Ruby provided its residents.
      Because of Ruby's large Mexican population (90 percent), Tallia was exposed to Spanish at an early age. She attended a three-room schoolhouse in Ruby that included 150 students in grades one through eight where teachers worked to teach English to students mainly of Mexican descent.
      When Tallia was 5, her father took her on her only visit to the Montana Mine in Ruby. Her father asked, "How would you like to go to work with me this morning?" They walked from their house to the mine. There, she got to ride the elevator known as "the cage," which Tallia in a recent interview described as a "rickety ride" into a dark and wet domain.
      This would be her first and last experience underground, which as she tells it did not last much more than five minutes. It left her wondering why men worked in the dark when they could work outdoors.
      Ruby was a company town - everyone paid rent to Eagle-Picher. They bought coupon books for $5 through the company and paid for their groceries using those coupons.
      The town had electricity powered by diesel engines and a physician, Dr. Woodard, hired by Eagle-Picher in 1930.
      A concrete jail was erected in 1934 as a temporary holding cell for prisoners who were transported to Nogales. Before the jail was built, prisoners were secured to a mesquite tree. Remains of the jail still stand.
      Between 1928 and 1940, 773,197 tons of ore were milled from the Montana Mine at a profit of $4.5 million. Eagle-Picher built a 400-ton flotation mill and developed the workings to a depth of 750 feet with six main levels extending several thousand feet along the ore vein.
      From 1935 to 1939, the Montana Mine was the largest producer of lead and zinc in Arizona. It ranked third in silver output in 1938. The lead-silver ore was shipped to a smelter in El Paso, while lead-zinc ore was shipped to the Eagle-Picher mill at Sahuarita.
      By 1941, profits from the mine diminished, and Eagle-Picher ceased mining operations at Ruby.
      Tallia and her family had left Ruby before then, in November 1938, when she was in the fourth grade. After a year with the Placer Dredging operation in Linden, Calif., the Pfrimmers moved to Tucson, where Tallia spent the rest of her youth.
      Tallia's mother always spoke fondly of Ruby; in later years, she said that if the mines hadn't played out, the family would have stayed there forever.
      Today the town of Ruby is privately owned and one of the best-preserved ghost towns in Arizona, with several dozen structures.
      William Ascarza is an archivist, historian and author of five books, including "Southeastern Arizona Mining Towns," available at Antigone Books, Cat Mountain Emporium and the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum. Email him at mining@azstarnet.com
      Share your photos
      "Mining Tales" writer William Ascarza is working on a book about the history of mining in Arizona, and he's looking for historical and modern-day photographs depicting mining operations, towns and camps to include in the book. If you'd like your photos included, email him at willascarza@gmail.com
      Take a tour of Ruby
      Pima Community College offers tours of the town of Ruby featuring Tallia Cahoon, who was born there in 1929. It will set up tours for six or more people, or you can attend a scheduled tour. The next scheduled tour is Nov. 8. Cost is $99 and includes travel and lunch. For more information, call 206-6579 or register by calling 206-6468.
      Sources: Interview with Tallia Cahoon, daughter of a Ruby mining engineer, conducted July 13, 2013; Bulletin No. 158 "Arizona Zinc and Lead Deposits"; "Ghosts of the Adobe Walls" by Nell Murbarger; "From Southern Arizona's Oro Blanco Region, Ruby, Arizona: Mining, Mayhem and Murder," by Bob Ring, Al Ring and Tallia Pfrimmer Cahoon; "Arizona Ghost Towns and Mining Camps" by Philip Varney.
       
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  • Our picks

    • This is the location of the famous Mojave Phone Booth. Unfortunately not much is left today, but it's still a cool location to visit with an interesting history. 
      • 1 reply
    • South Pass City WY
      South Pass City, approximately 90 miles north of Rock Springs, is a historic site administered by the state of Wyoming.  It consists of over 30 log, frame, and stone buildings, along with the Carissa Mine and Stamp Mill.



      South Pass City Historic Site
      • 11 images
    • Surprise Canyon, California
      Recently, I’ve been going through my old VHS video tapes and digitizing them to DVDs.  These tapes contain my travels and explorations between 1995 and 2009.  I thought I’d start releasing some video shorts of my early travels on this forum.

      The back story for this particular video is as follows.  On March 30, 1996, I made a short hike of about a mile and a third up the lower third of Surprise Canyon, on the western slopes of the Panamint Range, Inyo County, California.  This canyon is just outside of Death Valley National Park.  This canyon has running water running year round through the stretch shown, fed by substantial Limekiln Springs, and the canyon is a water wonderland.  For those not familiar with the area, refer to the two maps.  The first one shows the canyon in relation to the region, the other a close up of the canyon and the ghost town of Panamint City.  The blue line in the close up image shows the route that was taken.

      • 23 replies
    • Exploration Field Trips - March 31-April 2, 2000 - Into the Nevada Triangle with Lew Shorb
      My next series of videos will be based on a trip in 2000 that I took with Lew Shorb.  Lew is a board member here, as well as owner of the popular website http://www.ghosttownexplorers.org/ghost.htm

      In breaking with my past habit of culling out historical sites and ghost towns and creating short videos dealing with these, I decided to keep the exploring part of Explore Forums in and create videos of each day of my travel and exploration, including our camps.  Scenery, travel, camping ghost towns and wide open spaces.

      Part one of this series, as well as subsequent videos, will all appear here within this same thread. Part I will start in my garage, where I was finishing up with the packing my truck.  The following day, after work, I begin my travels to meet Lew Shorb at Rhyolite, Nevada ghost town.

      Our three day, two night travels prowled about the "Nevada Triangle" section of northeastern Death Valley National Park; and will include such sites as:

      1. The Las Vegas & Tonopah Railroad
      2. Gold Bar
      3. Phinney Mine
      4. Strozzi Ranch
      5. Currie Well (LV&T RR)
      6. Mud Springs Summit (LV&T RR)
      7. Happy Hooligan Mine


      This video, that of March 30th and 31st, will start off this series; and is brief, only being 3:28 long.  Nevada-Triangle_Shorb-2000_Part-1.wmv

      So, below is my narrative of part one of this series to give full context of what is seen in the video.  It will probably take longer to read than the video is long.

      --------------------------


       
      • 9 replies
    • Exploration Field Trips: May 1-3, 2000 - Trip with Alan Patera and Alan Hensher into Death Valley
      Exploration Field Trips:
      May 1-3, 2000
      Trip with Alan Patera and Alan Hensher into Death Valley

      What do you do with three authors, two 4x4’s, two two-way radios, three cameras, and camping supplies? Send them to Death Valley, of course. For three days in the first week of May, 2000, fellow authors and historical researchers Alan Patera, Alan Hensher and myself explored Death Valley north and south.

      Alan Patera writes and publishes the WESTERN PLACES series of monograph books.  Alan Hensher has been published in several periodicals as well as authoring several books, centering primarily on the history of Mojave Desert sites.

      Alan Patera, who hails from Oregon, came south to California and picked up Alan Hensher; then the two came my way. At the time I was living in Ridgecrest, California. After overnighting with my wife and I, the three of us took off for Death Valley.  Alan was busy researching and photographing for a future edition of WESTERN PLACES, this time centering on the camps of the Funeral Range, which forms the eastern border of east central Death Valley.  Circumstances and changes of our journey lead Alan to plant the seeds of two more future books, this time centering just outside the northernmost section of Death Valley.




       

       
      • 4 replies
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