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Been thinking of getting a new home security system for the home base, anyone have any experience with the systems like Nest, Ring, Simplisafe, etc? Would like something I can use when on the road to check my house. 

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I’ve seen the Ring in action.

Really nice resolution. Pretty impressive nighttime view, even with low lighting. Even full screen on an iPad it is sharp and clear.

Battery life in the outside unit is fine for day to day use, but for long periods away I think would be a problem. Unless there is a unit that can be wired into standard home doorbell wiring. The two batteries are rechargable and look like AA batteries but about double their size.

Sound through the outside speaker might arouse the curiosity of a cat sleeping on the porch, but certainly isn’t going to make Mr. Geek sound like an angry super hero and scare off intruders like the commercial implies.

It appears to me that the Ring could be easily defeated by a savy intruder. The unit easily pops off its base for battery replacement and can be left facedown or the batteries popped out. Or the lens covered with a piece of duct tape. The view is wide angle, but not that wide, and has a sharp cutoff at the edges. Someone thin could likely slide in and defeat it.

I’d think a multi-faceted approach would be best. Not just relying on just a video doorbell. With all the media about porch pirates, any criminal worth his stripes already knows how to get around that.

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There were a couple burgluries going on here and the way they caught them was a deputy sherriff K9 unit and a license plate number from somebody’s trail cam. 

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I used to work monitoring/installing security systems.  First thing you should know, the vast majority of alarms are user caused false alarms.  Alarm companies are not going to call police/fire/etc until they have reached someone via phone or failed to do so in 'x' minutes... those 'x' minutes vary depending on company and they will not likely tell you what that time is as it'll vary depending on your history.  Second, the people on the other end are minimum wage drones.

Cloud connected systems are a terrible idea, most are poorly secured and easy to interfere with and all of them are bug ridden.

The 'free' systems alarms companies give you to get you into paying monthly fees are pretty much a joke.  You'll likely get a GE Simon XT, complete with the default codes in place. sometimes they'll change the default master code of 1234 rarely ever do they change the installer code (4321) or dealer code (4321).  Unless they've changed they will require you have a POTS line to hook up the system to, cell module are expensive.

You have to seriously assess what your needs are.

For our particular situation, anything in the house that could be easily stolen would be fully covered by insurance.  I have a large gun safe bolted to the floor of the garage.  Anyone trying to break into that or steal it will easily be noticed by me neighbors (garage is about 10' from neighbors bedroom.. no late night projects but handy 😉

All of my exterior doors at steel, the hinges are pinned and I'm using high quality locksets and deadbolts.  Garage doors are probably the least secure (although I do lock them from interior and no opener) however breaking in form there would be in full view of street 1st floor windows have bars.  There are other security measures, some I forget others I'm not going to talk about on the public internet (no deathtraps, although it's been tempting 😉)

I have cameras monitoring house exterior and interior, any movement caused email and the images are pushed to an external server... Requires internet however local image storage is on a server that nobody's likely to find/notice so I have that for fallback if needed.

In all likelihood thieves would make off with some of our computers, there is no data on them that isn't secured and I have on and offsite backups.

When we leave the house for any extended time, I take some servers offline and park them in the gun safe.  Turn on some more cameras (old cell phones/tablets make really good security cams,nobody is likely to make off with an ancient phone/tablet add a prepaid data plan and super handy). 

The precautions I have taken are what work for us.  I'd lose some irreplaceable 'stuff' in the case of a fire however I'm okay with that.

*IF* you just want to be able to check on your home, I'd suggest a Synology NAS box and a couple of IP based cameras (Axis is my personal fav).  You can set that all up on your local network (no cloud based cameras).  There are tons of options for remote access, I think Synology has their own way you can remotely access your local NAS box... I wouldn't trust it much however I'd trust them a lot more than Google or any of the fly-by-night Internet of Broken Things hardware vendors.  I use SSH tunneling with pre-shared key auth (ONLY!) for remote access when I want to check on things.

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Oh yeah, if you want to 'roll your own' (I did that in Ohio).  I've got a Simon XT on the wall here, I'm pretty sure we can salvage some sensors as well.  All yours, just help me patch the hole 😉

These can be configured to call any phone number, have it set to call a neighbor....yourself..etc.   The wireless sensors seem to be very reliable, batteries last over a year if I recall.  In Ohio I had it setup with sensors on all of the storm doors, idea was it'd wake me up long before someone was actually in the house.  Didn't care about when we're gone much, same thing as here.. secure everything ...etc..

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2 minutes ago, El Polvo said:

If you live out a ways the best thing is trail cams. I have them so plates can be taken and it is auto sent to my phone. Amazon cheapos or wallymart

Good idea, I forgot about those.  Fairly easy to conceal so even if they can't ship the images elsewhere...  not too likely to be noticed.   Robust, I think they even have pretty strong case options that help prohibit theft in the field?  So far most aren't so 'smart' that they are stupid.  

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Thanks guys, some good info here. I am thinking of a two part plan, one with cameras where I can check in from anywhere in live view to see what is happening at home and a second security system with door / window sensors, motion sensors, etc ... when any sensor is tripped it's sent to my cell phone where I can quickly check in on the live cameras to make sure everything looks okay.

I am leaning towards the SimpliSafe model as they have back up batteries in the units for power outages and if the internet is out, they will send the alerts through local cell phone towers. Seems SimpliSafe has had some issues in the past, but after reading up on it, it seems they have fixed the issue. I also like how they have a smoke detector, freeze detector, broken glass detector, and carbon monoxide detector. Mainly interested in the smoke detector as it might be super useful to prevent a fire at home. 

I like the idea of being able to see what is happening in my house whenever, especially if any sensors are triggered. Of course a good gun safe is part of the plan. 

We have some crazy stalkers YouTube stalkers (one is a registered sex offender out of the central valley in California). He served time and barely makes sense when he contacts us after creating multiple accounts on all the social media platforms ...  so now we gotta take even more measures to protect our home when we are gone, and even while we are home. 

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Wyze cams.  Technically not "security" devices, but I have several and they work well (v2).  Probably going to get another one and try installing OpenIPC on it.  The Wyze app is pretty decent though, and I've had good luck avoiding false alarms by tuning the motion detection sensitivity and zones.  I get notifications on my phone, though I haven't tested much since I bought the XR and switched over to FirstNet.

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3 hours ago, desertdog said:

Wyze cams.  Technically not "security" devices, but I have several and they work well (v2).  Probably going to get another one and try installing OpenIPC on it.  The Wyze app is pretty decent though, and I've had good luck avoiding false alarms by tuning the motion detection sensitivity and zones.  I get notifications on my phone, though I haven't tested much since I bought the XR and switched over to FirstNet.

Dang those Wyze cams sure are...inexpensive... looks like others have had good luck with OpenIPC... I for one would be interested in details if you get around to trying that out.

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For cams my mom had me put up a couple of Arlos up at her Tahoe home and temporary at a home she was selling in northern CA. I wasn't really satisfied with the motion detection range as I wanted it to detect from farther away and have a detection cone closer to the width of what the camera saw. I had them placed outside positioned with the primary goal of getting the plate of a vehicle that came in the driveway. And it really would only catch if somebody came fully in the driveway. I think birds flying by or slight movement from a branch blowing in the wind would set it off but a coyote moving at a decent clip I felt could walk mostly though before being recorded. The camera that was installed in the house being sold was there to alert in case a squatter tried to break in. Something went wrong with the internet and it's off. It was nice to be able to check on things live etc but it wasn't reliable enough to depend on IMO. I like the trail cams as a back up idea. That being said they did catch a potential thief. 

 

 

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I got a few of the Wyze Pan Cams, they look very cool, and a few other security items to go with it. Has anyone here tried the pan cams by Wyze yet? 

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https://github.com/EliasKotlyar/Xiaomi-Dafang-Hacks

Looks to have support for pan cams. I've got a couple of the v2 cams on the way.  NOTE: Don't allow the cameras to update, it might break the ability to install this.

instructions: https://github.com/EliasKotlyar/Xiaomi-Dafang-Hacks/blob/master/hacks/install_cfw.md

OpenIPC instructions: https://github.com/openipcamera/openipc-firmware

I think OpenIPC uses the firmware from Elias Kotlyar, not sure what the differences are.

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Yeah I need to still order one more of the v2 Wyze units to test OpenIPC.  Been sort of busy with the new house, but I'll eventually get around to it.  They are very inexpensive cameras, but I've yet to have issues with them.  The Wyze app on the other hand can get somewhat buggy and funky.  Though the newest version of the app (major upgrade from the looks of it) does work much better.

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I just found out where I live you gotta get a permit from the local police department for an alarm ... so I filled out the application, paid the fee, and am waiting to hear back. Got a home security system from a sponsor in addition to the Wyze cameras and I think I will feel much better when I travel for work, which is about 70% of the time. I just got a brand new computer system for editing that I would hate to lose in a burglary, in addition to my other things like firearms, ammo, etc. 

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15 hours ago, Bob said:

I just found out where I live you gotta get a permit from the local police department for an alarm ... so I filled out the application, paid the fee, and am waiting to hear back. Got a home security system from a sponsor in addition to the Wyze cameras and I think I will feel much better when I travel for work, which is about 70% of the time. I just got a brand new computer system for editing that I would hate to lose in a burglary, in addition to my other things like firearms, ammo, etc. 

Permits are the norm, however AFAIK it's only required for monitored or audible alarm systems in most cases.   Install your own, have it set to call neighbor/yourself..etc..  no audable alarm and no permit needed...as a bonus criminal think you don't have  an alarm....  pretty sure NV has no duty to retreat 😉

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Might want to hold off buying new Wyze V2 cameras.  The 2 I have aren't loading the hacked bootloader properly, I've been able to revert to factory bootloader without issue.  Tried OpenIPC and Xiaomi-Dafang.  I suspect something may have changed, I'll have to solder a serial connection to the hardware and get a console to find out more.

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On 3/7/2019 at 4:07 PM, Bob said:

I just found out where I live you gotta get a permit from the local police department for an alarm ... so I filled out the application, paid the fee, and am waiting to hear back. Got a home security system from a sponsor in addition to the Wyze cameras and I think I will feel much better when I travel for work, which is about 70% of the time. I just got a brand new computer system for editing that I would hate to lose in a burglary, in addition to my other things like firearms, ammo, etc. 

Let me guess,  SimpliSafe? lol  I have one on the way also and they emailed me about the permit stuff. Told them it's actually going to be used in Tucson and they gave me the info for there too. 

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Good news, picked up a couple of new 32gb SD cards and retried installing dafang hack.  The OpenIPC doesn't appear to be able to handle the new image sensor (confirmed by similar issues reported by users).  However installing the Xiaomi-Dafang is working so far!  At least I have image.

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On 3/9/2019 at 7:55 AM, braindead0 said:

Good news, picked up a couple of new 32gb SD cards and retried installing dafang hack.  The OpenIPC doesn't appear to be able to handle the new image sensor (confirmed by similar issues reported by users).  However installing the Xiaomi-Dafang is working so far!  At least I have image.

Care to (if you have time) to do a write-up on the process?  :)

Any yes, Nevada has a Castle Doctrine, including no duty to retreat. 

 

Quote

NRS 200.120  “Justifiable homicide” defined; no duty to retreat under certain circumstances.

      1.  Justifiable homicide is the killing of a human being in necessary self-defense, or in defense of an occupied habitation, an occupied motor vehicle or a person, against one who manifestly intends or endeavors to commit a crime of violence, or against any person or persons who manifestly intend and endeavor, in a violent, riotous, tumultuous or surreptitious manner, to enter the occupied habitation or occupied motor vehicle, of another for the purpose of assaulting or offering personal violence to any person dwelling or being therein.

      2.  A person is not required to retreat before using deadly force as provided in subsection 1 if the person:

      (a) Is not the original aggressor;

      (b) Has a right to be present at the location where deadly force is used; and

      (c) Is not actively engaged in conduct in furtherance of criminal activity at the time deadly force is used.

      3.  As used in this section:

      (a) “Crime of violence” means any felony for which there is a substantial risk that force or violence may be used against the person or property of another in the commission of the felony.

      (b) “Motor vehicle” means every vehicle which is self-propelled.

 

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3 minutes ago, desertdog said:

Care to (if you have time) to do a write-up on the process?  :)

Any yes, Nevada has a Castle Doctrine, including no duty to retreat. 

 

 

I'll start a new thread and write up a short bit.

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