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Desert4wd

Cemetery - Mazuma / Seven Troughs / Tunnel Camp

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I've been working on this one for a while, but figure you folks already know the answer to this.  When researching the location for the "Mazuma" cemetery, I get mixed results, none of which seem to give the answer I am looking for. Perhaps the problem is that I'm expecting something else..lol. Anyhow, internet info. lists the Mazuma cemetery as "south" of the townsite of Mazuma, just before entering Seven Troughs canyon. Coordinates also list it as being on the hillside, north of the town. Others show it to be the Seven Troughs cemetery, located in front of the Tunnel Camp site. On the net, there is basically two sources which all others refer to.

 

On my trip a few weeks ago, I located what certainly looks like a cemetery, south of Mazuma, but I can't verify it.  Heading north on the road between Tunnel Camp and Seven Troughs, there are mill foundations on the left (west side) of the road prior to entering the Seven Troughs canyon.  Right about where this road passes by the mill site, there is a "tee" which "goes" right (east-northeast). Probably 100 feet down this road on the north side are several obvious mounds of rocks, when smoother surrounding areas. Thanks for your assistance and experience with this.

~Doug

 

8681978807_ea86420ea5_c.jpg

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I always thought it was the cemetery below Tunnel Camp, but wasn't completely sure. I don't recall seeing anymore in the area on the LR2000 either.

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I'm doing some research to see if I can find an answer. In the meantime, someone just had this up on eBay and it did NOT sell. If anyone is interested try contacting the seller to see if he will let you buy it directly...

 

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Vernon-Nevada-Mining-District-Historic-Seven-Troughs-Mining-Map-1912-Scarce-/261199107727?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3cd0ae168f&nma=true&si=XB8wRv5AYIGGub2AU1z1Morg1Ps%253D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557

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Maybe this will help...

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZodKQI35tI&feature=player_embedded

 

 

However, I just found this information, which states that there are no visible markers...

 

"The mining town of Seven Troughs is about 25 miles northwest of Lovelock. Seven Troughs is accessible from Lovelock by driving west on Lone Mountain Road about 3 miles, turning right, and passing the Lone Mountain Cemetery. The pavement ends about a mile or two after passing the cemetery. Thereafter, it's about a 20 mile drive on gravel road to Seven Troughs. Before entering Seven Troughs Canyon, this little cemetery will be visable on the right side of the road. There are no signs or grave markers in this cemetery and it is easy to miss it."

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Thanks for the info and video Cindy.   That is the cemetery below Tunnel Camp and there is no reason it should not be listed as the Seven Troughs Cemetery because it is within normal distances from town. Tunnel, was connected with Seven Troughs, so to speak.    What I've read concerning the Mazuma cemetery is the same as what you said above with no visible markers.  Also it's supposed to be "near" Seven Troughs Canyon which is +/- half mile away. I didn't measure it...lol. Plus it's supposed to be easy to miss. The one at Tunnel is well marked (could have been improved after the original comment.  There are too many gravesites from what i was expecting as well.  The apparent site I found would fit the bill with maybe five or six possible sites. (sure look like graves to me). No markers and near enough to the entrance to the Seven Troughs canyon.  I was thown off originally by the supposedly documented location and vague descriptions.   My primary goal here is to not loose this to history.

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Have no idea which cemetery they are actually at in the above video, but from all descriptions I have found they are not at the right location. They claim there are about 20 burials in the location they are at. The Seven Troughs cemetery should have about 7 burials, give or take a few, as a few of the dead from the flood were buried elsewhere, and no other burials were interred at Seven Troughs.  I believe this video was uploaded last month, so is very recent.

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Thanks for the info and video Cindy.   That is the cemetery below Tunnel Camp and there is no reason it should not be listed as the Seven Troughs Cemetery because it is within normal distances from town. Tunnel, was connected with Seven Troughs, so to speak.    What I've read concerning the Mazuma cemetery is the same as what you said above with no visible markers.  Also it's supposed to be "near" Seven Troughs Canyon which is +/- half mile away. I didn't measure it...lol. Plus it's supposed to be easy to miss. The one at Tunnel is well marked (could have been improved after the original comment.  There are too many gravesites from what i was expecting as well.  The apparent site I found would fit the bill with maybe five or six possible sites. (sure look like graves to me). No markers and near enough to the entrance to the Seven Troughs canyon.  I was thown off originally by the supposedly documented location and vague descriptions.   My primary goal here is to not loose this to history.

 

I must have read hundreds of old newspaper accounts, written within days of the first flood, hoping to find mention of the burial location, a funeral, something. It is odd that not one word about a burial ceremony was mentioned, nor a description of the cemetery's location. I read articles all the way into the following month, after another flood tore through the area, but still nothing.

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That is the cemetery below Tunnel Camp. I didn't count but there are quite a few more than seven buried here.  i thought all that died in the flood were buried in one place, presumably at the ones near Seven Troughs Canyon.

8685828907_6e264d64e9_b.jpg

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Nope, some of them were buried elsewhere.

 

Here is what I have found so far...

 

 

The DEAD

FONCANNON, Mrs. Julia  - wife of Floyd Foncannon - Burnt Canyon - buried in Hurley, Wisconsin **Survived Flood but died soon after

GILLESPIE, Perry (Thomas) - age 10 Mazuma - buried in Oakland, California - son of Mr. & Mrs. Matthew Gillespie - was at the home of the Kehoes when the flood hit. 

KEHOE, Mrs. William **Survived Flood but died soon after

KEHOE, George S. - age 4 - son of William Kehoe - buried Seven Troughs

KEHOE, James C - age 6 yrs. 8 mos. - son of William Kehoe - buried Seven Troughs

KEHOE, Ronald M. - age 1 yrs., 7 mos., 3 days - son of William Kehoe - buried Seven Troughs

KEHOE - Youngest child of William Kehoe - body never located

MCCLEAN, Mrs. Alex - Seven Troughs

O'HANLON, Mrs. Margaret - wife of Steve - survived but later died of her injuries

REESE, Mrs. - Mazuma

RUDDELL, Maude Edna - Postmistress in Mazuma - buried in Reno b. 1878 in Canada.  Maiden Name Maude Edna Mason. Divorced from Willard Ruddell and lived with a doctor and his wife after her divorce. 2 Children Minnie b. 1893  -  Rolof Willard Ruddell was born in 1900 and died abt. 1930 William J. Ruddell b. 06 Oct 1925 and died 18 Jul 1998 in Los Angeles. Hiram N. Ruddell born 10 Jan 1846 & married Elmira Hall on 18 Dec 1866.  She was born 20 Jan 1846 - 2 Children -  Mary Bell Ruddell born 24 Feb 1869 and Willard Ruddell born 21 Nov 1872. Willard Ruddell married Maude Edna Mason - 2 Children  Minnie Bell Ruddell born 26 Sep 1895 and Rolof Willard Ruddell born 01 Mar 1900

TRENCHARD, John - Merchant in Mazuma - survived flood but died 17 hours later. Buried in Watsonville, California

WHALEN, Mike - Mazuma - age 45 - according to 1910 Census, he was a quartz miner born in Indiana

The INJURED

ROSSMORE, Edna - hospitalized in Reno - leg amputated.

 

A descendant of the KEHOE family has also been found. His father was the "missing" Kehoe child, who was named Lewis. Here are the words of this Kehoe family descendant...

 

 

William J. Kehoe July 14 2012

I found the July 1912 Mazuma flood story very interesting. My family lost three boys and an Aunt in the flood. My father is the 8-year-old, Lewis Kehoe, who was able to save himself by clinging to a board.
There are a few corrections to the story I would like to make. The names of the parents of the children are: John S. Kehoe (Keheo) not William; and Mamie J. Kehoe (Keheo) not Edna. The family spelled their name Keheo at that time. My father, Lewis, changed the spelling to Kehoe.
The three sons who were lost in the flood were: Cletus J. Keheo, age 6; George S. Keheo, age 4; Ronald W. Keheo, age 1 1/2
Thank you for printing the story and allowing me to remember that this event took place 100 years ago.

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Thank you for that information.  Really cool to hear the story from William Kehoe and that there is still a living connection to the area. I do like that.

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You are very welcome :) Now, if I can just get the people at Find-A-Grave to correct their information for this cemetery I'll be a happy camper, LOL!

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The Tunnel Camp site has somewhere between 9 and 14 graves.  I say "between", because some graves are questionable and may be the result of decorative work, and not actual burials.  It's really tough to tell.  Some of the sites are small, suggestive of children, but again it is impossible to know.  People go out there and do stuff to the Tunnel Camp site - markers and decorations, mostly.  I'm sure unkind people have done 'other stuff' out there, too, unfortunately. 

 

Desert4wd if you want to share the coordinates of the 'suspected' site, I would appreciate it.  If it is as close to the mouth of the canyon as I think you describe, that is odd.  Folks usually don't bury their dead in the path of likely flash floods (digs up bones and bodies and generally displeases people!), but I suppose they could have ignored conventional wisdom. 

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Everything was such a disaster after the flood hit that they may not have been thinking properly when it came time to bury their dead. I know that about two weeks later another flood swept through the area, and possibly another right after that.

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Very good reads Cindy  - thanks for posting up.  I've seen a story or two in the past, but not the original material. Thanks for researching!

 

Desertdog, here is a link to a screen shot from goog earth: http://www.flickr.com/photos/desert4wd/8685690413/sizes/o/in/photostream/

40.27.16N, 118.45.47W (approx).  I believe its fair to say its close enough to the canyon entrance  (the vague description given by one of the cemetery/burial websites) but it is up on a rise to the south and definitely out of the canyon where the flood was.

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San Francisco Call, Volume 102, Number 35, 5 July 1907 — ROCK DRILLING CONTEST

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Los Angeles Herald, Volume 36, Number 106, 15 January 1909 — FATALLY HURT, HE EMPTIES PISTOL INTO HIS OPPONENT

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San Francisco Call, Volume 105, Number 134, 13 April 1909 — -TEAMSTER SHOOTS HIS WIFE

 

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Sausalito News, Volume 24, Number 34, 22 August 1908 — COAST EVENTS BRIEFLY TOLD

 

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Sausalito News, Volume 28, Number 46, 9 November 1912 — MINOR NEWS NOTES OF THE WEEK

 

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San Francisco Call, Volume 112, Number 52, 22 July 1912 — BOY VICTIM OF FLOOD TO BE BURIED TODAY

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Thank you for organizing all of this, Cindy.  I've seen a few of these via internet searches in the past couple of years, but not all of them.  The blurb about rebuilding "Mazuma" further up the canyon is a new one to me. 

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